Mac Engel

TCU basketball star, whose story inspired many, is done with the program due to injury

TCU point guard Jaylen Fisher discusses his college debut

TCU freshman point guard Jaylen Fisher discusses his college debut after opening with 13 points, 7 assists and 4 steals against St. Thomas. Video by Jimmy Burch
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TCU freshman point guard Jaylen Fisher discusses his college debut after opening with 13 points, 7 assists and 4 steals against St. Thomas. Video by Jimmy Burch

Once the highest ranked recruit to ever sign with TCU, and one of the program’s most inspiring stories, Jaylen Fisher’s playing career in Fort Worth is over, sources said.

The school has issued a press release confirming this report.

The junior point guard from Memphis, whose story of being born with Albinism has captivated many, has dealt with multiple knee injuries throughout his three years at TCU. He has not played since Christmas.

He also put his name in the NCAA transfer portal as he explores his options to potentially continue his playing career elsewhere. He currently is enrolled in the spring semester and is attending classes, which will delay his eligibility to play elsewhere on the Division I level.

TCU said it will honor his scholarship if he wants to remain at the school and pursue his degree. Fisher is also eligible to continue to receive treatment on his knee, but his athletic scholarship will be applied for a new recruit next season.

Fisher is now the fourth TCU basketball player to put his name in the ever growing NCAA transfer portal; Yuat Alok, Kaden Archie and Angus McWilliam have all put their name in the portal to potentially leave.

Fisher is the highest-rated player, and easily most proven contributor, of that foursome.

Since coming to TCU, he has had multiple surgeries on his knees, and one on his wrist. He also had surgery on his knee in high school.

Fisher appeared in nine games this season, and averaged 12.1 points per game. He last played in TCU’s win over Indiana State on Dec. 25 in Hawaii.

Before the season, however, he revamped the way he played to basically become a spot-up, successful 3-point shooter. He was no longer an attacking, penetrating distributor.

The knee swelling, stiffness and pain, simply never faded. He had the knee drained on multiple occasions to no avail.

Despite his talent and productivity, TCU never negatively felt his absence, primarily because of the presence of point guard Alex Robinson. The Horned Frogs are currently 13-3 and 2-2 in the Big 12.

Fisher’s pattern began in the spring of 2017 when he was a freshman; he suffered a season-ending broken wrist in TCU’s NIT victory against Fresno State. TCU won the NIT that spring.

In January 2018, Fisher suffered a torn right meniscus during a practice. He missed the final 16 games of the season. TCU made its first NCAA Tournament appearance in 20 years later in the spring.

In September 2018, Fisher had arthroscopic surgery on the same knee.

He had the knee drained several times since, but the problem is the problem.

His time as a TCU basketball player is over.

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Mac Engel is an award-winning columnist who has extensive experience covering Fort Worth-Dallas area sports for 20 years. He has covered high schools, colleges, all four major sports teams as well as Olympic games and the world of entertainment, too. He combines dry wit with first-person reporting to complement a head of hair that is almost unfair.

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