Dallas Cowboys

Jerry Jones addresses the elephant in the room: Overpriced, inferior preseason games

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones was a little annoyed during his Friday morning radio show after a comparison to the Los Angeles Rams’ offense and the Cowboys was made.
Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones was a little annoyed during his Friday morning radio show after a comparison to the Los Angeles Rams’ offense and the Cowboys was made. AP Photo

And to think that was nationally televised NFL action. Yikes!

Sure, the Dallas Cowboys (and Arizona Cardinals, for that matter) had a lot of personnel evaluations to make during Sunday night’s third preseason game at AT&T Stadium. NBC Sports was in town, too, to share all the excitement of a 27-3 Cardinals win which carried all the drama of a rush hour backup on I-30.

But Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones said after Sunday’s game that it’s “not the time” to evaluate whether the NFL’s preseason farce needs to be addressed. Most fans in attendance bailed on the game during the third quarter.

Look, they need to play the games to decide on their rosters and work some players into game shape. But charging fans a full price ticket for what we Sunday night needs another look. That’s nothing short of robbery.

“We know we’re trying to evaluate players out here,” Jones said. “We know, in general, our fans don’t want us to run and take unnecessary risk. That’s what you saw tonight.”

True, most die-hard fans across the NFL don’t want their star players getting hurt in a preseason game. So no one is begrudging the Cowboys, for instance, not playing Dak Prescott, Ezekiel Elliott, Sean Lee or Tyron Smith. Those are smart business decisions. Charging full price to watch the Cowboys commit eight turnovers is not a smart business decision. At least if fans come to their senses and stop falling for the season-ticket package which incorporates preseason games as if they’re the same thing. No, not even close.

“It was almost comical relative to the turnover situation,” Jones said, trying to muster up a laugh over Dallas’ three interceptions and five fumbles. “If you’re going to win with not a lot of offense, then you certainly need to run the ball about three times and kick it and wait on them to make the turnovers. We didn’t do that.”

But the game was bad because the Cowboys lost 24-3. The first-team defense held Arizona’s first-team offense to under 40 yards and no points when it was on the field. The Cowboys’ offense was missing its three best players. The game was meangingless. Which brings us back to the point. If you must play these games, why charge premium prices?

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