Texas Rangers

Beltre won't play six more years to catch Colon. What about five more months?

The oldest player in the major leagues turned a year older Thursday, though Bartolo Colon doesn't look a day over his 45 years when he's on the mound.

He is one of two MLB players who are in their 21st season. The other is his Texas Rangers teammate Adrian Beltre, who is 39 years old and on the 10-day disabled list for the second time this season.

Does Beltre plan on playing six more years?

"My wife would divorce me," he said.

What about five more months to finish this season?

"Well, yeah, I hope," he said. "That's the idea."

But the plan thereafter is unknown.

Beltre knows his playing days are winding down. He is in the final year of his contract with the Rangers, and consecutive seasons have been interrupted multiple times by injuries.

He has contemplated a world without the game he has been playing in the majors for more than half his life, but tries to not get lost in those thoughts.

Until he has convinced himself otherwise, Beltre will still be a ballplayer.

"I'm trying to be mentally prepared to get to that stage in my life, but as much as I want to think it, I never get too deep into it," Beltre said. "I do need to find some kind of hobby to keep me occupied besides my kids and my family. But there's no doubt I want to be mentally ready to understand that it's time."

The plan in two weeks is for Beltre to be off the DL and playing again, which he was unable to do Thursday as the Rangers lost 8-2 in the opener of a four-game series against the Kansas City Royals.

He again fielded grounders before batting practice, though only ones hit directly at him, and faced left-hander Matt Moore during a simulated game. Until he runs on the strained left hamstring, he really doesn't have a timeline to return.

"It's day by day," he said.

The plan in two months at the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline is also unknown.

While Colon is chasing Juan Marichal for the most wins for a pitcher from the Dominican Republic, and Nicaraguan Dennis Martinez for most wins by a pitcher from Latin America, Beltre is chasing a world title.

Among the teams who have established themselves as early contenders for the postseason, none is dealing with an obvious need at third base. A contender might also be weary of a deal for Beltre because of his recent injury woes.

Then again, Beltre is one of the most respected players in the game and a future member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Though the Rangers are looking like sellers, general manager Jon Daniels said on Monday that he doesn't give much thought to trading Beltre.

Beltre said last year after the trade deadline passed that he would consider waiving his no-trade clause if an attractive deal were proposed to him by general manager Jon Daniels, but Beltre also warned that there are no guarantees that a trade would equate to a ring.

He also has strong ties to the Rangers and to the Metroplex, where he has spent much of the past eight seasons. He and his family are comfortable here, and he has invested in the community charitably.

Beltre spent part of his Thursday at the Texas Rangers MLB Youth Academy in West Dallas, where a donation he made helped build Adrian Beltre Field. It's a full-size indoor infield with batting cages that can be lowered from the rafters.

The Texas Rangers Baseball Foundation announced a partnership with Energy Transfer Partners for the academy worth $1 million. Rangers co-chairman and managing partner Ray Davis co-founded the company in 1994 and retired from it in 2007.

"I'm happy to be a part of it," Beltre said. "I wish I could have had something like this when I grew up. If we are in a position to help, not only providing something like this, but coming to talk to the kids a little bit, it's nice to give back to the family and the people who really need it."

Beltre will retire some day, unless he wants to end up on Divorce Court. He has interests in horse racing and wineries, and would contemplate keeping his hands in baseball. Five years after he retires, he'll take his place in the Hall of Fame.

For now, though, he's still a ballplayer.

That much is known.

Royals 8, Rangers 2

Kansas City

020

020

220

8

11

0

Texas

000

000

011

2

5

1

Kansas City<QM>

AB

R

H

BI

BB

SO

Avg.

Jay lf

4

1

1

0

0

0

.292

Merrifield cf

4

1

2

2

1

1

.286

Moustakas dh

4

0

1

0

0

2

.282

Perez c

4

0

2

4

0

0

.254

Soler rf

5

0

0

0

0

3

.280

Dozier 1b

5

0

0

0

0

2

.172

Escobar ss

4

1

1

0

0

0

.241

Goins 2b

4

2

2

0

0

0

.262

Torres 3b

3

3

2

0

1

0

.667



Texas<QM>

AB

R

H

BI

BB

SO

Avg.

DeShields cf

3

1

1

0

1

1

.228

Choo dh

3

0

1

0

1

1

.256

Kiner-Falefa 3b

3

0

1

1

1

0

.262

Mazara rf

3

0

0

0

0

1

.269

Guzman 1b

1

0

0

0

0

1

.216

Rua 1b-rf

4

0

0

0

0

1

.155

Gallo lf

3

1

1

0

0

1

.199

Chirinos c

3

0

0

0

0

1

.186

Odor 2b

3

0

1

1

0

0

.177

Alberto ss

3

0

0

0

0

1

.000



E—DeShields (2). LOB—Kansas City 7, Texas 3. 2B—Merrifield (13), Moustakas (11), Kiner-Falefa (7), Gallo (7). RBIs—Merrifield 2 (19), Perez 4 (26), Kiner-Falefa (16), Odor (11). CS—Kiner-Falefa (2). S—Jay. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 4 (Moustakas, Soler 2, Dozier); Texas 2 (Mazara, Rua). RISP—Kansas City 3 for 10; Texas 2 for 7. Runners moved up—Jay, Kiner-Falefa. GIDP—Kiner-Falefa. DP—Kansas City 2 (Perez, Escobar), (Goins, Escobar, Dozier).

Kansas City

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

NP

ERA

Duffy, W, 2-6

7<AF>2/3

4

1

1

2

5

113

6.14

Hill

1<AF>1/3

1

1

0

1

3

33

3.00

Texas

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

NP

ERA

Bibens-Dirkx, L, 0-1

6<AF>1/3

8

6

4

1

6

109

5.68

Bush

2<AF>2/3

3

2

2

1

2

43

5.17

Inherited runners-scored—Hill 1-0, Bush 2-2. HBP—Bibens-Dirkx (Perez), Bush (Moustakas). WP—Duffy. PB—Perez (1). Umpires—Home, Quinn Wolcott; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Chad Whitson. T—2:53. A—23,230 (49,115).

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