Texas Rangers

A broken elbow broke his spirit, but Rangers' Andrus says he's improving

Elvis Andrus can't stand watching Texas Rangers on TV

Shortstop Elvis Andrus said on Friday that sitting at home away from the Texas Rangers the past week drove him crazy and that it was difficult to watch them on TV as he dealt with a broken right elbow.
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Shortstop Elvis Andrus said on Friday that sitting at home away from the Texas Rangers the past week drove him crazy and that it was difficult to watch them on TV as he dealt with a broken right elbow.

One road trip away from the Texas Rangers was one too many.

Elvis Andrus isn't staying home again, no matter how little he will be able to do while he waits for his broke right elbow to heal.

"It's awkward to say it, but I feel weird being at home for the first time in my life," he said Friday in his first media availability since being injured. "I'd watch a couple innings, and I just couldn't keep watching. You want to be there helping the guys and playing. Three or four innings, and after that I have to do something else."

Andrus is on the disabled list for the first time in his career after getting drilled April 11 by a pitch from Los Angeles Angels closer Keynan Middleton pitch with two outs in the ninth inning.

One of the most durable players in MLB the past 10 years, Andrus had been off the active roster only once. He hit the three-day paternity list last year for the birth of his son.

Having to go on the DL broke his spirit.

"There was a lot of emotions, for sure," Andrus said. "It was the first time I broke a bone in my body, the first time I've been on the DL. I think that was the worry in my head. I know I was going to play again, but just that time I'm not playing, what will I be doing? It's miserable not playing.

"It took me a couple days to realize and settle a little bit and tell myself that it just happens. It's nothing I can control. After that it was a lot easier."

Andrus hopes to start doing more rehab work by the middle of next week and is planning to travel on the remaining Rangers road trips before he can be activated from the DL. The original prognosis was that he would miss six to eight weeks.

Manager Jeff Banister said that he would welcome Andrus' presence on the bench despite Andrus' ability to talk nonstop. Banister also believes that Andrus should benefit from being forced to watch the game and study.

"I much rather have him on the field chirping," Banister said. "As tough as it is for him and us, there's something about these situations that you learn. There a gift that comes out of this. It is part of the growth of the player, and it's something that I believe most of these guys when they return to play, it changes their view and aspect of playing."

Andrus has company in the training room. Second baseman Rougned Odor continues to be slowed by a strained left hamstring. He doing some hitting, but hasn't started running or doing any lower-body weights.

Right-hander Doug Fister tested his strained right hip Friday with an extended bullpen session. He could come off the disabled list during this homestand, which runs through Wednesday.

The news was best for infielder Jurickson Profar, who was cleared to return to action after being in the MLB concussion protocol after a fall Monday.

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