Fort Worth

Tornado strikes Canton in East Texas after DFW storms leave damage in their wake

Severe storms damage Fort Worth neighborhood

Severe storms moved through the Dallas-Fort Worth area on Wednesday, May 29. Winds caused damage in the Heritage neighborhood of Fort Worth, downing numerous trees on Pendleton Drive and nearby streets.
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Severe storms moved through the Dallas-Fort Worth area on Wednesday, May 29. Winds caused damage in the Heritage neighborhood of Fort Worth, downing numerous trees on Pendleton Drive and nearby streets.

A tornado on Wednesday smacked the East Texas town of Canton, damaging businesses near the intersection of State Highway 64 and State Highway 19, authorities said.

The tornado struck about 5:15 p.m. after forming in southern Kaufman County near its border with Henderson County, according to the National Weather Service. It moved across the Cedar Creek Reservoir before directly hitting Canton, about 75 miles east of Dallas.

There was no immediate confirmation of injuries, although paramedics were dispatched to the Cedar Creek Country Club. Van Zandt County sheriff’s deputies reported damage to buildings and power lines.

Canton is familiar with devastating tornadoes. In April 2017, at least 54 people were injured and five killed after a violent tornado touched down near Canton.

Wednesday’s tornado then moved northeast of Interstate 20 toward Grand Saline and left debris on the road and limbs on power lines.

Tornado warnings began more than four hours earlier in Tarrant and Parker counties and continued throughout the afternoon.

The National Weather Service planned on Thursday to survey damage in far north Fort Worth’s Heritage neighborhood to determine whether it was caused by a tornado or straight-line winds.

There, fences were blown down, live oak trees were broken and shingles were knocked off rooftops. The damage covered about a two-block area around the 3700 block of Oliver Street. There was also damage on Pendleton Drive and Horace Avenue.

Bunny Ober, 66, was stunned first by what she did not hear. “I didn’t really notice the wind,” she said.

The wind’s power became clear when it created a vacuum when she opened her front door. Soon after, Ober waited out the storm in a bathroom with her daughter and grandsons, 15 and 12.

Later, from the middle of the street, she watched as chainsaws buzzed to clean up downed tree limbs and debris. She glanced at a shingle that hung in a tree.

“I don’t know how we’re going to get that down,” she said.

Video taken in the Heritage neighborhood in north Fort Worth shows the aftermath of a storm on Wednesday, May 29, 2019. Heavy winds took down trees and fences.

A tornado was also reported east of Dallas, in Rockwall County. Storm sirens sounded across Tarrant, Denton and Parker counties as warnings were issued. Elsewhere, power poles were damaged by what appeared to be strong winds in Saginaw.

The Star-Telegram’s media partner, WFAA, reported bleachers were damaged at baseball fields at Leon Tuttle Park in Rockwall east of Dallas.

A rare late May cold front helped trigger Wednesday’s storms.

Storm chances won’t completely go away over the remainder of the week, but it will be far less than what was seen on Wednesday.

“I think we’re finished at least for the short term,” said Matt Bishop, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

There will be a 20-30 percent chance of thunderstorms every day through next Wednesday.

Video posted on Snapchat shows storm clouds and what appears to be a funnel in Fort Worth, Texas.

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