Northeast Tarrant

Carroll grad overcomes dyslexia to achieve academic success

Kat Camp, a 2012 Carroll graduate, visited Carroll High School May 11 to talk to parents and educators about overcoming dyslexia. Camp wrote a children’s book as part of a college project.
Kat Camp, a 2012 Carroll graduate, visited Carroll High School May 11 to talk to parents and educators about overcoming dyslexia. Camp wrote a children’s book as part of a college project. sengelland@star-telegram.com

When Kat Camp was in first grade, she had trouble spelling her name. Because of her difficulties learning the alphabet and early reading skills, she was tested for dyslexia.

“My parents were told, ‘She has the worst case of dyslexia we’ve ever seen and the highest I.Q. we’ve ever seen,’” Camp said. “I felt like a smart kid trapped in a dumb mind.”

Through the teachers in the dyslexia program in the Carroll school district and adopting several strategies along the way, Camp learned to read and to thrive as a student.

This spring, the 2012 Carroll district grad shared her story at the CISD Special Programs PTO meeting at Carroll High School.

In her presentation, Camp said she repeated the first grade and started in the dyslexia program. In elementary and intermediate school, she got accommodations to help her learn. When she reached middle school, Camp decided to drop the accommodations as a trial run for high school.

Throughout her secondary school years and in college, she went to her teachers early in the year.

“I told my teachers ‘I’m dyslexic and I’m probably going to struggle in your class,’” she said.

Camp said she made a practice of going in for help when she needed it.

Her strategy paid off.

A few weeks ago, Camp graduated magna cum laude from Utah Valley University in Orem, Utah, with a degree in animation and game development.

While in college, she wrote and illustrated a children’s book that was part of a class project. She had copies of the book, written in both Spanish and English, for sale at the meeting, with proceeds going to help children in need.

Camp’s former elementary dyslexia teacher Sherri Meadows, now CISD lead dyslexia teacher, said that Camp’s dyslexia came with a gift that allowed her to see the world in a unique way.

Now she develops intricate virtual environments with perfect proportions.

Camp shared five tips for success:

1. It’s okay to get frustrated.

2. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

3. Set goals for yourself.

4. Don’t let others set your limits.

5. Never use dyslexia as an excuse.

Meadows said that her team would be adding videos of student success stories like Camp’s to the resources available on the Carroll website.

For more information, go to southlakecarroll.edu.

Sandra J. Engelland: 817-390-7323, @SandraEngelland

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