Northeast Tarrant

Bronze unicorn spreads its wings above downtown Grapevine

A crowd gathered before the Christmas parade in Grapevine on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015, to watch the unveiling of a bronze winged unicorn sculpture atop the Grapevine Convention and Vistors Bureau headquarters.
A crowd gathered before the Christmas parade in Grapevine on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015, to watch the unveiling of a bronze winged unicorn sculpture atop the Grapevine Convention and Vistors Bureau headquarters. Star-Telegram

Imagine, a massive bronze unicorn statue commissioned by the city, is flying 50 feet high above the sidewalk in Historic Downtown Grapevine.

The 800-pound sculpture, which sits atop the Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau’s north tower, was dedicated Thursday night before the city’s annual Christmas parade.

The piece, which is 7 feet tall and 9 feet from wingtip to wingtip, joins the Grapevine’s Public Art Trail, home to more than 25 pieces of public art.

Grapevine officials said the winged unicorn symbolizes action, dreams and wishes that come true.

“It’s a city of dreams and imagination,” said Paul W. McCallum, executive director of the convention and visitors bureau, who has long been a supporter of the unicorn piece.

$60,000 spent by Grapevine on the design, fabrication and installation of the uniform sculpture

The city spent approximately $60,000 on the design, fabrication and installation of the sculpture. Grapevine’s Public Art is funded by revenue received from cell antennas atop Grapevine water towers.

The unicorn is positioned in the stance of taking off and children from area special needs programs inscribed their names on its back.

To create the statue, Linda Lewis of the Grapevine Foundry was selected from eight artists, based on the vibrancy of her unicorn design and that she would involve local citizens and students in the sculpting process. She began the project in January.

It represents what we want people to think of their community — where dreams can come true.

Grapevine Mayor William D. Tate on the unicorn sculpture

The CVB headquarters south tower features the whimsical vertical time and temperature, clock-like wind dial and gold weather vane with its American Indian influences.

Lewis, who has a studio on Main Street, creates everything from bronze horse heads to life-size statues. She said her craft “comes effortlessly to me.”

Marty Sabota, 817-390-7367

  Comments