Northeast Tarrant

Southlake's Carillon Parc promises to be another mixed-use shopping destination

A new developer, HCCP Carillon Partners Llc., wants to revive the mixed-use project at Carillon with a focus on experiential entertainment, chef-driven restaurants and one-of-a-kind mom-and-pop shops. The proposal also includes 40 to 50 residential lofts on the floors above the retail.
A new developer, HCCP Carillon Partners Llc., wants to revive the mixed-use project at Carillon with a focus on experiential entertainment, chef-driven restaurants and one-of-a-kind mom-and-pop shops. The proposal also includes 40 to 50 residential lofts on the floors above the retail. Handout

After a decade of delays, Carillon Parc cruised through the first of two City Council votes and has secured financing to pay for the 42-acre project.

Carillon Parc is the proposed retail and restaurant component of the larger Carillon residential community that’s been built at White Chapel Boulevard and Texas 114 over the last decade. Homeowners bought those homes —ranging in size from zero-lot line villas to sprawling estates that front a pond — with the understanding that they’d have a walkable European-style shopping and dining area along the frontage road and White Chapel Boulevard.

The retail component fell by the wayside during the recession and had several false starts since.

Now HCCP Carillon Partners, LLC came up with a new concept with one-of-a-kind chef-driven restaurants, a meat market, artisan bakery and even a new city library. At the center would be an 8-acre central park with large-growth trees that will be preserved.

“This will look and feel established from the day we open it by keeping the large trees,” said John Terrell, the former Southlake mayor who is one of the development partners for the project. “We want to draw people into the experience to where they won’t know what’s around the corner.”

The council will have a public hearing and final vote on the zoning change at its June 19 meeting.

If approved, construction of the roads and utilities could begin in early 2019, buildings would follow in late 2019 or early 2020 with grand opening in early 2021, said Laird Fairchild, another partner on the project.

And not a moment too soon for residents who live nearby.

Supporters crowded Town Hall for the City Council, Planning and Zoning Commission meetings and a community meeting. It’s rare for a project of this size to breeze through without any opposition in Southlake, especially when it introduces a residential loft component.

Carillon Parc has taken a different approach with Terrell — who sat in countless controversial zoning changes during his years as mayor — leading the charge. They met with residents several times over the last year or so to address concerns before going to council.

Mary Lee Alford was the liaison between the developer and the residents and a staunch supporter of the project.

“We love Southlake and we think this area of Southlake is the first impression when you’re driving in from the west,” Alford said at the P&Z meeting last month. “We had numerous meetings with the developer, they listened to the residents. They came back with new plans and addressed every single issue. We’re ready to get this thing going.”

There will be 40 to 50 residential lofts with retail or incubator spaces on the bottom floor. The units will sell for $1 million to $1.2 million and the council required that they be owner occupied, not put up for rent.

Terrell agreed to the stipulation and said he would like to have that in the zoning language.

The residential component will provide the built-in foot traffic for the restaurants and retail shops. There’s also a row of villa homes that will blend in with the existing zero-lot line homes already in Carillon.

Some areas of the project will be pedestrian only with plazas that overlook parks and open spaces. Terrell envisions parents watching their children play in the park while enjoying dinner or drinks on the patio of a restaurant.

The library would replace the existing one that’s in the basement of Town Hall. The upper floor would have performing arts space for fine art performances.

Carillon Parc could feature two hotels, a boutique hotel in the heart of the development and a larger grand hotel along the frontage road.

The park spaces could host festivals and other special events, including farmers markets. The central feature of the park, and the namesake for the Carillon development, will be the bell tower, which will chime to draw people in for special events.

With an eye to the future, Terrell said they are purposely designing the parking garages without steep decks. If autonomous vehicles and rideshares gain popularity, parking garages could become obsolete. Terrell said Carillon Parc’s garages could be converted into other uses if they weren’t needed for parking anymore.

They’ll also have charging stations for electric vehicles and special parking for golf carts.

White Chapel Boulevard will be widened to a four-lane divided roadway from Texas 114 to Kirkwood Boulevard. There would be deceleration lanes so traffic can easily get in and out of the development.

“This has to happen right up front,” Terrell said. “That would be part of our partnership agreement with the city.”

As traffic increases, the city could put a traffic light at the intersection of White Chapel and Kirkwood boulevards.

Carillon resident David Digiovanni has seen several concepts come and go since he moved into the development.

“It wasn’t until these developers showed up that there was something better than the original plan,” he said. “It’s a gem that could be built there that we could all have a lot of pride in.”

Art in the Square in Southlake attracts artists nationwide to the Town Square to show off their work and have some fun.

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