Northeast Tarrant

Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Grapevine a day of healing

Participants raise flower pinwheels representing the stages of the disease and honoring loved ones during a Walk to End Alzheimer’s event in Grapevine.
Participants raise flower pinwheels representing the stages of the disease and honoring loved ones during a Walk to End Alzheimer’s event in Grapevine. Special to the Star-Telegram

With many who attended Oct. 8’s Walk to End Alzherimer’s calling it a day to remember, hundreds of people came to offer their support.

Among those were co-chairs Becca and Sarah Duncan, who were featured in an Aug. 28 Star-Telegram article titled “Alzheimer’s won’t rob sisters of wedding photos with Dad.”

To regain a sense of control after their dad, Scott, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, twins Becca and Sarah decided to start a team for the Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Northeast Tarrant County.

The Oct. 8 walk in Grapevine marked their third, and their first year as honorary co-chairs.

As a way to pay personal tribute to their father, the twins — who have no immediate plans to marry — in July dressed in donated white lace wedding gowns and posed with their father for wedding photos.

Both plan that when they do marry, and their octogenarian father is possibly gone, Scott’s photos with them will be a centerpiece of their wedding plans.

“We knew our father may not be alive for our future wedding, so we decided to capture the poignant moment before it was lost forever,” Becca said.

Sarah added: “It was very emotional, especially after we put on our dresses.”

Becca said their involvement with the annual walk is cathartic.

“Now that I’m an honorary co-chair for the walk I get to do something I’ve always wanted — tell people my story and help out others,” she said. “When we first started, I saw what the walk represented and really looked up to those who spoke about their experiences. And now I get to do that. It means a lot to my family.”

The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research, said Elizabeth Sehon Harris, spokeswoman for the Alzheimer's Association — North Central Texas Chapter.

The North Central Texas Chapter covers a 40-county service area and Fort Worth serves as headquarters for the chapter, which has regional offices in Abilene, Waco and Wichita Falls.

The chapter is a nonprofit, donor-supported organization. The programs and services are made possible through contributions from individuals, corporations and foundations.

Sarah said the annual walk is a deeply personal way of showing support.

“I’m not a doctor. I can’t go search for a cure on that level,” Sarah said. “The best I can do is set up a team to honor him and do my best to make him proud.”

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