Dallas Cowboys

If you want to trash talk to Cole Beasley, that’s fine by him. He can dish it back

Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Cole Beasley scored twice and had 101 yards receiving in the 40-7 win over the Jacksonville Jaguars last week. The 101 yards are the second-most in his career.
Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Cole Beasley scored twice and had 101 yards receiving in the 40-7 win over the Jacksonville Jaguars last week. The 101 yards are the second-most in his career. AP Photo

Cole Beasley doesn’t hit the football field looking to talk trash to defensive backs.

If he hears it, however, watch out.

The Dallas Cowboys’ veteran leads the team with 294 yards and 26 receptions and, perhaps, smack-talking comebacks, if last week’s win against the Jaguars is any indication.

Beasley, who had a season-high 101 yards receiving and his first two touchdown catches in the win, dished it right back when Jaguars defensive backs got mouthy, specifically former Cowboy Tyler Patmon.

“If you don’t talk trash to me, I don’t say anything. I just play,” Beasley said. “There were a lot of guys who were pretty chippy on the other side of the ball, so it kind of brought the trash-talking out of me a little bit. Really, if they don’t say anything, I don’t say anything either.”

Beasley wasn’t just talking a good game. The 101 yards receiving is his most since Nov. 8, 2015, and the second-most in a game in his career. The nine receptions and two touchdowns tied career-highs.

He’s already close to matching his 2017 season totals (36 receptions for 314 yards and four touchdowns) as the Cowboys (3-3) prepare for Week 7 against the Washington Redskins (3-2).

“Last year was bad. That was one of my worst years, mentally as well, just trying to keep it together because of that,” said Beasley, who blames over-thinking before games for slowing him down. “That’s probably been the biggest change for me this year and I owe a lot of that to [receivers coach] Sanjay [Lal] and the mentality he’s brought into that room.”

Lal’s message has helped Beasley and the receiving corps feel more satisfaction from winning their routes whether they say the ball or not.

“As a wideout you want the rock. All of us have come from places where you’re getting the ball constantly or we wouldn’t be here. We’ve been able to showcase our skills and been able do that,” Beasley said. “It gets hard sometimes when you don’t feel the ball every now and then. It’s harder to keep a rhythm, but it’s our jobs to do that and whether it’s one target or five, we have to come through.”

Veteran Allen Hurns, who is in his first season with Dallas, didn’t appreciate Beasley’s skill for getting open until becoming his teammate.

“No, not at all. I heard little things about him. But I really didn’t know Bease was that kind of player, a matchup issue,” Hurns said. “He is a guy if you put him out there 1-on-1, nine times out of 10 he is going to create separation with his quickness. People try to say he is just a slot receiver but how he runs routes he is able to create separation. We don’t put him on the outside but he can do it all.”

Beasley doesn’t care if he’s called the Cowboys No. 1 receiver. Just keep giving him a chance to make plays.

“No. 1 receiver is who gets the most targets and who gets the ball,” he said. “Other than that, everybody has their prototypical idea of a No. 1 receiver but really it’s different based on offense and what kind of system you’re in. [Wes] Welker was a No. 1 receiver for New England forever. And [Julian] Edelman and guys like that. He doesn’t have to be 6-foot-4 and win on fade balls and go over the top of everybody all the time. No. 1 [receiver] can be how your offense chooses to use a guy.”

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