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Why Stephen Jones says idea of Jerry Jones caring more about money than rings is a joke

Young fans try out some of the Dallas Cowboys players’ iconic moves

Tanglewood Elementary students mimic some of the iconic Dallas Cowboy moves such as Leighton Vander Esch's wolf howl and Ezekiel Elliott 'Feed Zeke' move.
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Tanglewood Elementary students mimic some of the iconic Dallas Cowboy moves such as Leighton Vander Esch's wolf howl and Ezekiel Elliott 'Feed Zeke' move.

Has Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones lost his fire now that he is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

And is Jones now more content with making money off the Cowboys than winning Super Bowls?

Those are some of the questions people are asking regarding the continued patience with coach Jason Garrett after eight years and just two playoff wins from the same man who fired legendary coach Tom Landry and two-time Super Bowl champion coach Jimmy Johnson in his first five years of owning the team.

Vice president Stephen Jones said those points of view are laughable to even think about.

“That’s almost laughable if you know Jerry Jones,” Stephen Jones said on 105.3 The Fan Thursday. “I think that’s a joke. Nothing burns hotter in his belly than wanting to win a championship. He would have given up, I think on record, saying giving up the Hall of Fame in a second to have another Lombardi Trophy. I mean, no one is burning the candle at both ends more than Jerry, more, you know, far from being content in terms of where we are as a football team. You have tough decisions to make every year in terms of what’s best for the team, but I can tell you no one is content around there. He’s challenging everybody. I just laugh when I hear something like that. That is the furthest thing from the truth.

“It’s not about the money when it comes to a Super Bowl. You don’t want to know what he would pay in terms of dollars to get a Super Bowl for our fans, for this organization, sooner than later. There’s no one content and it starts right at the top with the one who is the least content in terms of having things be status quo, doing everything he can to obviously push all the buttons that he can to motivate our group, whether it’s myself, whether it’s the scouting department, the coaching department, or the players to be the best and to take the next step. So, like I said, that’s laughable.”

If anyone really questions Jones’ fire and fight at 67 years old they can point to a year ago when he single-handedly challenged a contract extension for NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and supported running back Ezekiel Elliott in his fight against a six-game suspension, resulting in a $2 million fine.

So the real question is what can the Cowboys do to put a winning team on the field and take the next step toward the Super Bowl in 2019.

Stephen Jones said that is the primary focus of the franchise and they are approaching the offseason with the same “backs against the wall” mentality the team used to rebound from a 3-5 start, win the NFC East and a wild-card playoff game before losing to the Los Angeles Rams in the divisional round.

It’s also not lost on him that the last four times the Cowboys won the NFC East - 2007, 2009, 20014 and 2016 - they didn’t make the playoffs the following season.

“Slowly but surely focused on next year and getting over a big disappointment,” Stephen Jones said. ”I know it was for our fans and obviously for our team and our coaches and our organization. But there is a lot to be positive about. As we said all year, we have to build on each game. I think we had our backs against the wall and we have to improve on this season as the next step. We can’t go back in the past like we have after a playoff year and then don’t make the playoffs. We’ve got to not only get back, but take the next step. That’s going to be our battle cry as work to improve this football team and make things better.”



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Clarence E. Hill Jr. has covered the Dallas Cowboys as a beat writer/columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram since 1997. That includes just two playoff wins, six coaches and countless controversies from the demise of the dynasty teams of the 1990s through the rollercoaster years of the Tony Romo era until Jason Garrett’s process Cowboys.


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