Texas Rangers

There will be a distinct Texas flair at Globe Life Field. And what about the sun?

Take a sneak peek into the construction of Globe Life Field

Here is a sneak peek at the updated construction at Globe Life Field, the future home of the Texas Rangers. It has a projected cost of $1.2 billion and sites on 13 acres.
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Here is a sneak peek at the updated construction at Globe Life Field, the future home of the Texas Rangers. It has a projected cost of $1.2 billion and sites on 13 acres.

There will be a distinct Texas flair to the exterior of Globe Life Field and the surrounding landscape whenever the new home of the Rangers opens up for the 2020 season.

That was the message Bryan Trubey, executive vice president of HKS and the principal designer of Globe Life Field, told the media on site on Thursday.

The design team incorporated a number of different materials, the majority of which are being produced in the Lone Star State, that reflect the elements of form and structure, transparency, and landscape.

“We wanted to create a kind of architecture that’s not only responsive but, quite frankly, is unique nationally to other ballparks,” Trubey said.

Among the materials from Texas being utilized include: steel from Justin, curtainwall system from Alba, masonry veneer from Denison, precast walls from Corsicana, and limestone from Lampasas.

Trubey said HKS did a “great deal” of research within Globe Life Park to determine some of the features of the new stadium.

“What we wanted to do was understand the things we loved about Globe Life Park and wanted to understand some of the things we would improve,” he said. “We knew we wanted to have arches, we wanted to use Texas materials. ... The existing ballpark looks in on itself. We wanted to create a ballpark that is very open all the time.

“One of the fundamental differences between Globe Life Field and Globe Life Park is that we have a retractable roof. We wanted everyone to be comfortable in the middle of the summer, and we also wanted it to feel open and transparent.”

Speaking of transparency, Trubey said there would not be any sunlight coming into the stadium’s field of play from the West.

“Most of our fans are sitting on the West side of the facility,” he said. “We have a lot of depth on that side of the building. One of the reasons we have the screens on the porch area on the West side of the project is to filter the sunlight and make the experience of being on the West concourse a beautiful thing. We won’t have direct sunlight from the West coming into the ballpark in terms of the field of play.”

Outfielders, third base and shortstop can rejoice.

Sports editor William Wilkerson is back for his second stint with the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. He first worked at the paper after graduating from the University of Texas at Austin. He most recently was the Executive Editor of College-Team Sites for CBS Interactive/247Sports and has also worked at ESPN, Scout.com and the Austin American-Statesman.
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