Texas Rangers

If Round Rock becomes the Astros’ Triple A affiliate, where would the Rangers turn?

Former Rangers president Nolan Ryan, left, with general manager Jon Daniels in 2012. Ryan is now with the Astros organization, which could move its Triple A affiliate to Round Rock.
Former Rangers president Nolan Ryan, left, with general manager Jon Daniels in 2012. Ryan is now with the Astros organization, which could move its Triple A affiliate to Round Rock. Star-Telegram archives

Texas Rangers president and general manager Jon Daniels had nothing but good things to say about the organization’s relationship with its Triple A affiliate, the Round Rock Express.

But Daniels acknowledged that eight-year partnership could be coming to an end in the coming weeks. Round Rock is owned by Ryan-Sanders Baseball, and it has seemed inevitable that the organization would eventually switch to the Houston Astros after the fallout between Daniels and then-Rangers president Nolan Ryan.

Plus, Ryan’s son, Reid, is now the president of business operations for the Astros and his other son, Reese, runs Ryan-Sanders Baseball.

“The relationship with Round Rock has been outstanding,” Daniels said. “Ryan-Sanders Baseball has been great. [Express president] Chris Almendarez, [Express GM] Tim Jackson, the people we work with on a regular basis, Reese Ryan, the whole crew has been absolutely top-notch and really enjoy our time there.

“That being said, we also understand family is family. If it ultimately goes that way, we get it and are really appreciative of our time there to this point. We’ll see where it goes these next couple of weeks.”

The Express season ended with a canceled game on Monday in Iowa, and teams and affiliates can inform each other of plans a day after the season ends.

That conversation will likely happen sooner than later between the Express and Rangers.

If it ends, the Rangers have several options for their next Triple A home. Nashville, which has been an Oakland affiliate, is a strong contender.

Nashville, in fact, may be more attractive than San Antonio. The Colorado Springs affiliate is relocating to San Antonio, but San Antonio doesn’t have a great Triple A ballpark.

Wolff Stadium has been around for 25 years and has only 6,200 fixed seats. There is no pending renovation project, either.

Other cities that could be looking for teams include Fresno (California) and Las Vegas.

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