Golf

Harris English ran out of birdie chances to hold off Spieth at Colonial

Harris English, above, had a strong game Sunday with a final-round 66, but he couldn’t find a way to hold off Jordan Spieth at the Dean & DeLuca Invitational at Colonial Country Club.
Harris English, above, had a strong game Sunday with a final-round 66, but he couldn’t find a way to hold off Jordan Spieth at the Dean & DeLuca Invitational at Colonial Country Club. rrodriguez@star-telegram.com

Dean & DeLuca Invitational runner-up Harris English was in position to take the tournament title in the final round Sunday.

Then a flurry of Jordan Spieth birdies took him out of contention down the stretch.

“I wish I would have had a couple more good birdie chances coming down the stretch, but that’s how golf is,” said English, who shot a final-round 4-under-par 66, but finished three-shots behind Spieth. “Jordan has played really well coming down the stretch. I was just right there. I guess, to put pressure on him, and it didn’t work out.”

English shared the lead or led outright through the first 11 holes in the final round. He had an eagle on No. 1, but had no birdies after the 11th hole.

Spieth had all pars on the front nine, then closed the event with six birdies in the final nine holes.

“Spieth did some pretty spectacular stuff coming down the stretch,” English said. “It’s not easy to lose, but it’s easier to lose like that when somebody just outplays you.”

The kick save at 17

Ryan Palmer might be a Colonial member, but it was Dallas native Jordan Spieth who got a home-course bounce on No. 17 on Sunday.

After making birdie at 16 and taking a one-stroke lead over Harris English, Spieth hit his tee shot left on 17, but the ball bounced into the lower leg of marshal Dave Gustaf and kicked back right. It gently settled into the rough, leaving Spieth a clear path to the green.

When Spieth walked up to his ball he Gustaf if it had him, and when he said it had, Spieth gave him an emphatic "Thank you," drawing a chuckle from the crowd.

He also signed a glove and presented it to Gustaf, all while the tournament hung in the balance. Pretty cool customer, said Gustaf, a second-year volunteer who monitored the 15th fairway all week.

Asked if he'd ever been hit by a ball, Gustaf laughed and said: "I've hit people with balls, but this was a first."

CBS TV talk

Fort Worth native Lance Barrow, the network’s coordinating producer for golf and NFL football, is in his 40th year with CBS network and worked his 40th Colonial Sunday. He still calls Fort Worth home and is a Colonial member.

“I can’t believe it happened so fast. That’s a great longevity in our business,” Barrow said. “I’ve gotten to see so many great events and meet so many great people. It’s a blessing.”

Barrow was a junior at Abilene Christian when he talked to CBS Sports executives about working his first Colonial tournament. Three days later, Barrow said, CBS associate director of golf Chuck Will “changed my life by putting me in the 18th tower with Pat Summerall,” the network’s lead golf analyst at thee time.

Barrow has been a mainstay of the network’s golf and NFL telecasts ever since, winning 12 Emmy awards during his time with the network. He received his most recent Emmy for the network’s coverage of Super Bowl 50.

Related stories from Fort Worth Star Telegram

  Comments