Boys Basketball

This Nelson basketball player really should be called for traveling

David Nzekwesi last season. The native of The Hague was born nearly 5,000 miles from Trophy Club, Texas.
David Nzekwesi last season. The native of The Hague was born nearly 5,000 miles from Trophy Club, Texas. Courtesy NISD/M. Fisher

Plenty of players seem to get away with extra steps and never get a traveling call, but one Trophy Club Nelson player is way overdue.

You see, David Nzekwesi traveled over 4,900 miles to get here.

The 6-9, 240-pound power forward was raised in The Hague, Netherlands, before coming to Texas in the seventh grade.

He and his brother, Emmanuel, a 2015 Nelson grad, made the move to the US when their parents recognized their talent early and wanted them to be able to take advantage of all the sport can offer here.

Emmanuel also played basketball for the Bobcats and is now with Oral Roberts after collecting Freshman of the Year honors in the Summit League last season.

Nzekwesi (pronounced N za quay zee), is a unique blend of power forward and outside shooter.

Among the schools looking to attract Nzekwesi are Mercer, Oral Roberts, Fresno State, Abilene Christian, Boise State, Texas State, Rice, Air Force and North Texas.

Nzekwesi said one of his attributes is his good footwork for a big man.

That may have been a factor of him playing soccer in his younger days starting off in sports in The Netherlands. He said it’s been about seven years since he’s played soccer competitively, though.

“Basketball is so much bigger over here,” he said.

Being able to shoot well from the outside at his size makes him a hot commodity at the next level, too.

Currently, Nzekwesi has 20 college offers but he said he’s waiting until the end of the season to make a decision.

Among the schools looking to attract Nzekwesi are Mercer, Oral Roberts, Fresno State, Abilene Christian, Boise State, Texas State, Rice, Air Force and North Texas, among others.

“David has a lot of upside,” said Nelson head coach Scott Curran. “He’s only 17, so he will graduate young. He has a bright future ahead.”

Even though he started off a year ahead of where he would have normally started in school when he moved here, Nzekwesi said he’s had ample time to adjust to the more physical style of play in the U.S.

Adjusting on the basketball court has been one thing. Adjusting to his new country was another.

“Texas is so big,” he said. “Living here and learning English was the toughest,” Nzekwesi said, noting Dutch is his first language, which is still spoken most of the time at home with his parents.

“My parents are very good with English,” he noted.

He said the biggest difference is simply the vast variety of fast food choices here. Being 240 pounds, he’s likely tried most of them.

Should he take a girl on a date, though, he likely won’t let it be “Dutch treat,” as he said he had never heard of that term.

Dutch chocolate, though, he’s had no problem understanding, noting that The Netherlands is renowned for its chocolate and cheese.

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