Letters to the Editor

Social Security; horse meat; legal marijuana

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., and the House GOP leadership, pauses while talking to reporters at the Republican National Committee headquarter on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 14, 2016, about their response to the deadly shooting in Orlando on Sunday that left 49 dead and more than 50 injured. Ryan said that a ban on Muslims entering the U.S. as presidential nominee Donald Trump proposes, is not in the nation's interest.
House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., and the House GOP leadership, pauses while talking to reporters at the Republican National Committee headquarter on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 14, 2016, about their response to the deadly shooting in Orlando on Sunday that left 49 dead and more than 50 injured. Ryan said that a ban on Muslims entering the U.S. as presidential nominee Donald Trump proposes, is not in the nation's interest. AP

Social Security

House Speaker Paul Ryan likes to be thought of as our “budget guru.”

One of the first things out of his mouth is usually that something has to be done about this “entitlement problem.” Think about what he’s saying.

People drawing Social Security are not moochers or freeloaders. They paid into the system for, say, 50 years with the understanding that they would get a certain amount back late in life. They are owed that money.

A deal is a deal, but when it comes time to pay off, Ryan & Co. want to change the deal by hacking away at benefits and making folks work until they die. This is shifty and dishonest.

Maybe it would be easier to pay what we owe if we quit starting wars, borrowing money from China to pay for them and giving billionaires and big corporations the free lunch they don’t need.

Joe Thompson, Fort Worth

 

It’s a fact that women are paid less than men for equal work.

Your Social Security benefits are based on how much money you earned. Thus, women will continue to make less than men from their Social Security benefits for the rest of their lives.

The government can’t seem to do anything about “equal pay for equal work,” but equal Social Security benefits for women is something it can do something about.

Joseph King,

North Richland Hills

Horse meat

I fail to see the problem with slaughtering horses for food.

Many people in the world apparently need meat, and there’s an abundance of surplus horses in the U.S. Why not solve both problems?

Horses once were used to pull wagons, plow fields and do other work, but these needs have vanished.

All over the world, people eat every imaginable type of wild and domestically raised meat. If a person is inclined to eat horse, let him do so. Horse meat has been a diet staple for many years in parts of Europe.

Here, ranchers raise cattle, swine, goats, sheep and other assorted livestock for slaughter. I can think of no good reason that they shouldn’t raise equine animals for the same purpose.

I’m not aware of any farm animal hierarchy. The horses being sent to Mexico for slaughter and distribution are surplus animals.

They’ll be destroyed anyway. Why not use the meat for food and the hides for leather? Or has emotion and nostalgia overcome old-fashioned horse sense?

Larry McGuire, Crowley

Legal marijuana?

I couldn’t believe what I was reading in the Star-Telegram. (See Thursday news story “Businessman plans to start medical pot farm in N. Texas.”)

The powers that be are setting things up to make medical marijuana legal in Texas, but won’t allow casinos (another money-maker for Texas)!

I guess nobody in neighboring states wants to pay big bucks to stop a marijuana industry in Texas!

Gerry Carey, Mineral Wells

  Comments