Letters to the Editor

Third party; Starr and Baylor

The university said in a statement Thursday, May 26, 2016, that it had suspended Briles "with intent to terminate." Starr will leave the position of president and chancellor.
The university said in a statement Thursday, May 26, 2016, that it had suspended Briles "with intent to terminate." Starr will leave the position of president and chancellor. AP

Third party?

Cynthia M. Allen believes Donald Trump is not “Republican at all” and that Mitt Romney as an independent candidate will give dissatisfied Republicans the country club politician they crave. (See May 27 column, “Time for third-party candidate to get into the race for the White House.”)

She should realize that Trump is a manifestation of politics the GOP has cultivated for years.

Long ago, Republican leaders used wedge issues like abortion, gay marriage, gun control and scapegoating of minorities and immigrants to rally support for other policies primarily designed to benefit the wealthy — policies not viable by themselves in national elections.

Instead, GOP politicians have watched gleefully as those from the Tea Party tried to intimidate Democrats during passage of the Affordable Care Act. Now that the GOP has welcomed the jackals into its den, it has no choice but to reckon with them.

An independent candidate may be an alternative for those unwilling to vote for either party’s nominee, but I doubt Trump will be the only demagogue to earn the endorsement of the Ku Klux Klan while carrying the GOP banner in a presidential election.

Armin Willis, Colleyville

 

I don’t get the logic of Romney as a third-party candidate. That would mean a split vote by conservatives, and we’d have another Democratic president destroying our country like Barack Obama.

Michael Lucas,

Weatherford

Starr and Baylor

Former Baylor President Ken Starr spent years and millions of taxpayer dollars investigating President Bill Clinton’s consensual sex life. But he proved incapable of investigating rape and sexual assault on a campus of which he was president.

Scoring cheap political points and winning football games were more important.

Walter Slaven, Arlington

 

The scandal at Baylor exposes the hypocrisy of Ken Starr.

The puritan who reported every detail of Bill Clinton’s escapades ignored the immoral conduct of his athletic program as long as it produced wins and filled the coffers.

Starr’s willingness to pursue a political agenda as independent counsel thrust a presidency and a nation into turmoil. His unwillingness to demand high standards in overseeing Baylor encouraged and endorsed a culture of ends by any means.

Sadly, students were severely harmed and a once-respected institution damaged.

Jeff Horton, Granbury

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