Letters to the Editor

Party for Pi; homelessness; sign litter

A yearly homeless census is being unveiled in Fort Worth, many homeless staying around the East Lancaster area where social service organizations have facilities, Thursday, February 25, 2016.
A yearly homeless census is being unveiled in Fort Worth, many homeless staying around the East Lancaster area where social service organizations have facilities, Thursday, February 25, 2016. pmoseley@star-telegram.com

Party for Pi

For socially inclined friends with mathematical skills and interests, Monday will be a wonderful time to host a party and to celebrate with the consumption of all sorts of pies: pecan, chocolate, mince meat, lemon, etc.

The celebration would be in recognition of a significant day highlighted by an act of Congress in 2009.

You may conduct an Internet search for “H. RES. 224, March 9, 2009.”

It documents that the U.S. Congress occupied its time to debate and approve this House resolution that establishes National Pi Day!

Those of you who’ve benefited from mathematics classes may remember that the digital representation of Pi is 3.14159 … on and on with digits to an infinite number of decimal places.

Because the first three digits are 3.14, Congress decided that National Pi Day should be March 14.

So, for all of you math experts, get out your social calendar and start working on a big Pi celebration on Monday!

Dwight Albert Sharpe,

Aurora

Homelessness

To end chronic homelessness, we must start running in a different direction. (See Sunday editorial, “The battle against homelessness goes on”)

Three issues, if addressed, should lead us in a different direction.

The Community Mental Health Act of 1963 led to the mass evacuation of patients from mental health institutions.

Those who were of “no danger to themselves or others” were discharged and given their “freedom.”

For many this meant the freedom to be homeless.

The criminal justice system, based on punishment rather than rehabilitation, releases prisoners who have “served their time” with enough money to get them out of town.

As the divide between the rich and the poor grows, more people are pushed into poverty.

Social, economic and political change is “blowing in the wind.”

Have we the courage to embrace it?

Bernard and Carol Kern, North Richland Hills

Sign litter

It would be nice if all of the politicians would go everywhere and pick up their signs.

They are littering, and the primaries are over.

June Greiner,

Lakeside

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