Letters to the Editor

Women’s health; welcome, refugees

Protestors begin gathering at the Speaker's Circle on the University of Missouri Columbia campus Monday, Nov. 30, 2015, to protest the unviersity's decision to sever ties with Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri.
Protestors begin gathering at the Speaker's Circle on the University of Missouri Columbia campus Monday, Nov. 30, 2015, to protest the unviersity's decision to sever ties with Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri. AP

Women’s health

I’m a third-generation supporter of Planned Parenthood.

I believe in the right to make my own choices about my own body. I believe in the need for sex education in our communities.

I believe in the right of all people, regardless of income, to have access to health screenings, preventative testing and birth control.

Planned Parenthood provides all of this in a caring, non-judgmental way.

I’m appalled by the Republican leaders in Texas who are very disconnected from what real Texans need in their lives.

Republican politicians say they want smaller government that doesn’t interfere in citizens’ lives.

Yet on this subject they choose to be intimately involved in the personal healthcare decisions of Texans.

It’s baffling and disturbing.

I’ll continue to support Planned Parenthood for myself and for all of those who don’t have a voice.

Debby Arnold, Fort Worth

 

Texas is at it again, trying to further defund Planned Parenthood.

We should have learned our lesson when we severed Planned Parenthood from the Medicaid Women’s Health Program.

According to the state’s own data, that decision resulted in a 26 percent decline in Medicaid claims.

That translates to thousands of Texans losing access to healthcare.

In a state that already has one of the highest rates of uninsured residents, this makes no sense from a policy standpoint.

The myth that community health centers can absorb Planned Parenthood patients is busted by Texas’s own data.

As a breast cancer patient, I have great empathy for any woman going down this path.

I can imagine a woman on Medicaid with a lump in her breast having nowhere to go for healthcare services that would offer a diagnosis and referral for a treatment plan.

She has been cut off from her trusted provider.

That is the real cost of cutting Medicaid funding from Planned Parenthood.

Rosanne Zafferano-Smith, Granbury

The late Molly Ivins once said, “If Texas were a sane place, it wouldn’t be nearly as much fun.”

Molly knew a thing or two about fun; she knew that having breast cancer was “massive amounts of no fun.”

Do you know what else isn’t fun? Losing access to basic healthcare services that prevent or provide early detection of things like cancer.

If Gov. Greg Abbott gets his way, that is exactly what will happen to more than 13,000 women across Texas who depend on Planned Parenthood as their approved Medicaid provider.

Only 30 percent of private healthcare providers in Texas accept new Medicaid patients, and Planned Parenthood is there to fill the crucial gaps.

Eliminating access to essential healthcare services such as well-women exams, breast and cervical cancer screening, birth control and pregnancy counseling to thousands of women across the state can hardly be considered sane.

It’s all fun and politics until our poorest women get hurt. Denying access to basic healthcare services isn’t good for Texas families and doesn’t place a priority on life.

It’s time for our governor to stop his political showboating and do what’s right for Texas.

Elizabeth Beck, Fort Worth

Welcome refugees

Thank you for publishing the life-affirming article by Rabbi Ralph Mecklenburger and other local religious leaders reminding us all once again that — before he was anything else — Jesus was a Jew. (See Sunday commentary “Clergy: Our holy books say we should welcome refugees.”)

Guelma B. Hopkins,

Fort Worth

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