Letters to the Editor

GOP healthcare; refugees

The State Board of Education narrowly rejected a proposal that would have given it the option of creating an expert panel for the sole purpose of identifying errors in textbooks.
The State Board of Education narrowly rejected a proposal that would have given it the option of creating an expert panel for the sole purpose of identifying errors in textbooks. AP

Refugees

The idea of taking in Syrian refugees misses the obvious.

When the U.S. tried to train Syrians to fight for their country, they used it as an excuse to get into Western Europe or the U.S.

They are cowards and opportunists.

Do we really want them in our country?

We have enough of this type already.

The governors are right in resisting an influx of people from anywhere.

Joy Victor Springer,

Saginaw

School textbooks

Whether you have school-age children, grandchildren and/or great-grandchildren, or none of the aforementioned, as a Texan, you should be very concerned by how the State Board of Education handles choosing textbooks for our children.

The SBOE has tentatively approved several changes in its textbook adoption process. This move was prompted by a Houston-area mom who was outraged that African slaves were defined as “workers” in a ninth-grade textbook.

Even with such inaccuracies, the SBOE narrowly rejected a proposal to create an expert panel for the sole purpose of identifying errors in textbooks.

Reasons for rejection ranged from sending a signal that the current textbook adoption process isn’t sound (duh!) to the addition of experts to “fact check” would add a layer of bureaucracy to the process.

A part of the rejected amendment would have created “philosophical differences” between the board and professors who review proposed textbooks.

So, let’s just keep dumbing down our kids with misinformation and pretending that philosophical differences between a professor and a bigoted biased bunch of people doesn’t warrant investigation.

Judy B. Beeman,

Weatherford

GOP healthcare

I’m deeply concerned about Jeb Bush’s healthcare plan.

It seems the GOP candidates want us to return to the “good old days” and give total control to insurance companies, allowing them to pick and choose customers and charge whatever they want.

They call this “freedom of choice” and imply that it’s preserving individual freedom.

To even suggest that “sicker” individuals should pay higher prices is discriminatory and heartless.

Do they not consider that many sick people may temporarily be unable to work, resulting in reduced income, possible job loss, being slotted into a higher-cost group forevermore, and possibly forced onto Medicaid, if eligible, or no coverage?

I see nothing requiring insurance companies to provide coverage.

I have friends using Obamacare. They say it’s half the price they paid when buying private plans and the coverage is so much better.

If there are problems, let’s fix them instead of trying to dismantle something intended to help the many who couldn’t get or afford health insurance.

Margaret Billard,

Bedford

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