Letters to the Editor

Is the middle finger the answer to a protest sign you disagree with?

Cathy Clark, center, stands with fellow activists protesting the policy of separating immigrant children from their parents detained at the southern border on Friday, June 28, 2019, on University Drive in Fort Worth.
Cathy Clark, center, stands with fellow activists protesting the policy of separating immigrant children from their parents detained at the southern border on Friday, June 28, 2019, on University Drive in Fort Worth. Star-Telegram file photo

The Danish prime minister went easy

All I can do is shake my head at the apologists for President Donald Trump explaining how it was reasonable for the president to propose that the United States buy Greenland, as Marc Thiessen did in his Sunday column, “Idea of buying Greenland is far from absurd.” (5B)

They list all the reasons it would be great for the United States to own the island. Unfortunately, they seem to forget that this is not the 19th century. Inhabited lands are no longer bought and sold, with the inhabitants treated like crops or cattle.

The Danish prime minister did Trump a favor by calling it “absurd.” What she should have said was “barbaric.”

Dennis Novak,

Fort Worth

An asymmetrical response to signs

Dozens of us gather on University Drive weekly to demonstrate against the imprisoning of children and separating families along our border with Mexico. Last Friday, a man drove past me and another demonstrator, glared at us and flipped us off. My sign read, “Show compassion, not cruelty,” and my fellow demonstrator held a sign reading, “No kids in cages.”

Perhaps he read the signs incorrectly. To the man: I hope you feel better next Friday, and perhaps your glasses should be cleaned. Certainly, I know of nobody who could rationally react in such a manner to citizens asking for kindness and compassion.

Dr. John Quincy,

Arlington

No more scrutiny for Trump’s business

A Sunday letter writer said President Donald Trump should comply with the new California law requiring a presidential candidate to furnish his federal tax returns to get on the ballot in that state. (4B) California passed the law expressly to keep the Republican presidential candidate off the ballot.

Democrats, who already own California, are not happy with the Electoral College. They want unanimous wins by not giving the voters a choice. Democrats can have California, but they can’t dictate national election rules.

President Donald Trump’s business dealings have already been scrutinized more than any other president’s. Applauding this California law is un-American.

Randy Weeks,

Roanoke

One side has the facts behind it

I very much enjoy reading columns by Eugene Robinson and Leonard Pitts Jr. Both of these fine writers base their opinions on facts.

I’m sorry if their opinions seem a bit too negative for some of your readers, but the columnists’ sometimes subject matter of President Donald Trump is all about the negative himself. He lies daily and has said some of the stupidest things ever.

Google the facts Robinson and Pitts write about, and you’ll find their commentaries to be honest and fair, unlike Trump.

Elizabeth Tye,

Arlington

Already a resource to buy a home

We don’t need licensing and more bureaucracy that will make building new homes even more expensive. (Aug. 18, 1A, “Buyer beware; Texas does little to hold homebuilders accountable”) Consumers need only to search for and choose a high-quality builder from the Greater Fort Worth Builders Association that serves eight counties.

I have served on the board of this wonderful association for 10 years. It furnishes products to any number of excellent, dedicated, well-trained and caring builders who deliver tremendous homes for very fair prices and furnish great follow-up services to buyers.

These dedicated men and women work hard for you, so don’t think you have to settle for anything less.

Johnny Dwire,

Weatherford

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