Letters to the Editor

From Sean Spicer to Michael Cohen to Buzzfeed: It’s lie fatigue

Who is Michael Cohen?

Michael Cohen was Donald Trump’s personal lawyer and avid supporter. On Aug. 21, 2018, Cohen plead guilty to eight counts, including campaign finance violations.
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Michael Cohen was Donald Trump’s personal lawyer and avid supporter. On Aug. 21, 2018, Cohen plead guilty to eight counts, including campaign finance violations.

We have all heard this song before

I never trust a story that cannot be confirmed by other news outlets, and the office of special counsel Robert Mueller rebutting Buzzfeed’s story about President Donald Trump directing his former lawyer Micahel Cohen to lie to Congress about negotiations to build a Trump skyscraper in Moscow is a case in point. (Jan. 19, 8A, “Mueller statement disputes report that Trump had fixer lie”)

But one of the many reasons so many people were quick to believe it is that on his first day in office, Trump directed his then-press secretary Sean Spicer to lie about his inaugural crowd size. It’s a well-established pattern: Trump lies and expects his staff to lie for him.

Unfortunately, I can hear the screams of “It’s all fake news!” already.

Blake K. Wallace,

Arlington

Listen to wisdom from the past

My copy of “The Confessions of Augustine in Modern English,” translated by Sherwood E. Wirt, states on Page 43: “If some rule of life is agreed to by custom or fixed by law in a city or nation, that rule should not be broken at the pleasure of a citizen or an alien. For each part offends that does not harmonize with the whole.”

St. Augustine was a doctor of the Roman Catholic Church identified as the “Doctor of Grace.” May our lawmakers choose a path of peace and justice instead of the chaos we witness on the border.

Deborah Fleischmann,

Fort Worth

Trust in Trump’s negotiation skills

I listened to President Donald Trump’s speech explaining his immigration plan. True to form, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and company rejected it.

Trump wasn’t my first choice for president. He is often a braggart given to exaggeration, and his tweets cause me concern. However, he has excellent business skills. He saw that our great country was in serious trouble and decided to run for the presidency to use his skills to steer our country back in the right direction.

By contrast, President Barack Obama was a smooth, skilled speaker, but his policies were detrimental to the security and prosperity of our people.

Trump has refused to sign a spending bill that doesn’t include funding for a border wall. I believe he is fully aware of the Democrats’ tactics. They say, “Give us what we want, and then we will consider what you want.” But they are being deceptive. That’s why the president must stand firm.

Ruth Cawyer,

Stephenville

Citizens should have the power

Technically, President Donald Trump did not shut down the government. Ostensibly, Congress has not funded the government since it refuses to bring to a vote any bill that Trump is likely to veto because it doesn’t include a border wall.

Please contact your representatives and senators and urge them to fund the government. Congress may be able to override a veto if brought to a vote. Let’s put employees back to work with pay.

Deana Glenn,

Fort Worth

Why they’re the rules of the road

Please recall your driver’s handbook for turning.

For right-hand turns, you follow along into the right lane on the street you turning onto. And when you are turning left, you likewise get the left lane. This theoretically eliminates motorists turning right and drifting to the left lane on the thoroughfare they are entering. Again, from the left lane, it’s the same thing: You go to the left lane, not any one you choose.

Just think how much better traffic would move following these simple rules.

James Newberry,

North Richland Hills

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