Letters to the Editor

Is the Rangers’ Jon Daniels a genius or the leader of “brainwashed” management?

Things got so bad for the Rangers on Monday that they had to use outfielders Carlos Tocci, above, and Ryan Rua as pitchers. It was the first time in club history the Rangers used two position players on the mound in the same game.
Things got so bad for the Rangers on Monday that they had to use outfielders Carlos Tocci, above, and Ryan Rua as pitchers. It was the first time in club history the Rangers used two position players on the mound in the same game. The Associated Press

On Jon Daniels: The ship is sinking

I saw my first Rangers game the very first year back in 1972. Been a fan ever since.

I fondly remember listening to games on the radio out in West Texas. Now that I live in Ft. Worth I rarely go see the Rangers in person, not because they are losing, but as a result of upper management.

Jon Daniels and his brainwashed owners ran the ship into an iceberg.

The sinking of the SS Ranger happened the moment Nolan Ryan was booted out the door. A franchise with two World Series trips has become a doormat and a whipping boy.

This week they lost to Oakland 15-3 and then blew a 10-2 lead against the A’s to lose 13-10.

—Brian Rosson,

Fort Worth

On Jon Daniels: Best is yet to come

We’re lucky to have Daniels.

Have we forgotten that the pieces were put in place by Daniels for the World Series runs before Nolan Ryan came on board, and Ryan was the one who made the situation divisive?

Daniels is extremely aware of the baseball landscape and the makeup of the Rangers’ organization. The talent level at the top is low now because Daniels traded the good talent to add all-star players to the team when there was still a chance to compete, as any good general manager would do.

The way we should judge Daniels is the level of talent in the lower rungs of the organization, which is very good.

—Adam Legler,

Arlington

Engel’s right: Too much $$ in soccer

Mac Engel could not be more correct about soccer in the United States. (“The unspoken problem of soccer in the U.S.,” July 6)

Pay-for-play is a big problem. That goes for other sports as well.

There’s too much money and adult involvement.

Growing up, my friends and I would get off the bus from school, grab a ball, meet up and just play. We played for hours.

The only parent involvement was when we needed Mom or Dad to buy us a new ball since Jimmy hit it in the woods again, or it fell apart from too much time on the concrete.

—James Greer,

Fort Worth

Charge for parking, not for garden

Please keep the Botanic Garden free.

Here are some ideas:

Charge Christ Chapel to use the parking lot.

Add a surcharge for Concerts in the Garden that patrons know will help the garden.

Charge the schools for field trips.

But do not charge for one of the last free natural spaces in Fort Worth. Do not turn it into another “entertain the kids” place.

Children need to be able to walk through a garden without being “engaged” in an activity!

—Shanna Cisneros,

Fort Worth

Support Trinity Shakespeare Fest

It’s shameful that TCU has cut support for the annual Shakespeare festival, better known as the Trinity Shakespeare Festival.

For ten years my wife and I have been attending the festival and we have been continually astounded by both the quality of the acting and the production put into each play.

If Fort Worth is to strive to be a leader in the future, shouldn’t we lead in culture?

—Mark Johnson,

Fort Worth

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