Letters to the Editor

Stand or kneel? Readers vocal about national anthem, Trump and the Eagles

President Donald Trump participates in a "Celebration of America" event on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, June 5. Trump quickly scheduled the event with military bands after canceling a visit with the Philadelphia Eagles as he stoked fresh controversy over players who protest racial injustice by taking a knee during the national anthem.
President Donald Trump participates in a "Celebration of America" event on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, June 5. Trump quickly scheduled the event with military bands after canceling a visit with the Philadelphia Eagles as he stoked fresh controversy over players who protest racial injustice by taking a knee during the national anthem. AP

Anthem: Owners, not players, make the rules

There is no free-speech issue with NFL player protests. ("Kneeling NFL players are losing the game ... the PR game. They need a new protest," May 29)

I know of no business that will tolerate employees taking action in the workplace that reflects negatively in the minds of customers.

If you don't understand, take a few minutes each day and hang signs in your workplace windows saying, "We think our flag and country stinks."

Then see how long it takes management to respond.

NFL stadiums are workplaces. The NFL and teams are the employers. The employers set the workplace rules.

First Amendment rights refer to government interference with free speech. It does not apply to a workplace.

—John Shreve, Keller

Anthem: Disagrees with editorial

The editorial presented Colin Kaepernick’s message as a very clear silent dissent, a PR theory developed after the fact.

It portrayed this as patriotic free speech, dismissed employee/employer relationships, identified President Trump as a dissenter (irrelevant), stated this was censorship, and suggested primarily veterans were upset.

Most fans are upset, and the majority of us see this as inappropriate.

We still love to hear the national anthem preceding sports games, and it give us goosebumps!

Most tellingly, the editorial described the media as "in their corner" — very true!

The bias shown for such out-of-place antics continues.

—J. Mark Bronson,

Fort Worth

Anthem: Kneeling isn't disrespectful

Rita Cotterly's letter perfectly sums up the situation with our national anthem. ("Anthem protesters are quiet, respectful," Letters, June 26)

The worst aspect of all this furor over the anthem is that those making the furor make many forget about our First Amendment rights.

Also, since when did kneeling show disrespect?

The NFL and those who have encouraged the league to penalize athletes for their respectful statements are acting disrespectfully to the athletes.

We have stood for the anthem proudly in two different countries, but we believe more strongly in our Constitution.

If we did not have a Constitution, we wouldn't even need an anthem.

—Frances Roger, Bedford

Anthem: Stand for freedom of NFL 'religion'

There are many ways for the world to express freedom of religion and speech.

Some Americans may think others' customs are strange.

One of our religions, NFL football, has its strange customs: painting faces, wearing ballcaps backwards, getting nachos during the anthem and praying that God pick a side.

America’s dear leader thinks it is unpatriotic not to stand during the playing of the anthem.

Does anyone think he is religious or patriotic?

We don’t really want our religious or public activities controlled by the leader of our country, do we?

Freedoms of religion and speech are what we cherish.

Don’t allow anyone to interfere with our religious activities

—Jon Van Winkle,

Fort Worth

Anthem: Does the president know it?

Donald Trump had invited the Philadelphia Eagles to celebrate their Super Bowl victory in June.

That was four months after the game.

Did he need time to learn the national anthem?

—Anne M. Sanders,

Fort Worth

Fort Worth: Honor police pensions

I was born and raised in Fort Worth and I love this city.

During my career, I have been hit by cars, fought criminals in the street and been injured more times than I can recall. But I stayed.

Eight men died in the line of duty during my career. They died doing what their duty for our citizens.

I have witnessed intolerable acts of violence and I have been the last person many people have spoken to before they slipped away.

But I always stayed.

I stayed because of a promise that there would be a good retirement that was guaranteed by the city. We fulfilled our duties in good times and in bad.

We ask that the council give us the benefits we earned and were promised.

We served honorably.

We now ask that you do the same.

—Kevin Foster,

Weatherford

Hurst: for Shotwell

As past mayor of Hurst, I see why prominent local officials like Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley and County Commissioner Gary Fickes are endorsing Howard Shotwell for City Council in Saturday’s runoff.

Howard is the clear choice.

He genuinely cares about the quality of life for our residents and businesses. His 20 years serving on committees and commissions, along with his passion on the Mid-Cities Care Corps advisory board and the H-E-B Chamber of Commerce board, show he continues to make a difference.

Former Hurst mayors (Bob Hampton and I) join area mayors and the Hurst Firefighters Association #4660 to endorse Howard.

Hurst has a legacy of strong city councils. Let’s keep it that way.

Please vote Saturday.

—Richard Ward, Hurst



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