Letters to the Editor

Diversity at TCU: changing the school and world, and other letters

TCU360.com reported that the mark of 20,000 applications marks the first time in history the university has taken in that many applications for first-year students.
TCU360.com reported that the mark of 20,000 applications marks the first time in history the university has taken in that many applications for first-year students. Handout

Changing TCU first and then the world

I watched my son graduate at TCU. What a spectacular day!

Then, the morning after graduation, I read about TCU's lack of diversity. ("Analysis: 70 percent of TCU students are white," Sunday)

What if instead, there were an article about some of the amazing students of diverse backgrounds who graduated?

What if that inspired students from diverse backgrounds to look at TCU?

I talked to some:

A student whose father was a Fort Worth police officer killed on duty.

A student from Burma who came to America for a better life.

An Army vet who came to TCU 10 years older than the typical student.

These three will become teachers to lead the next generation.

There are similar stories from nursing, business and the arts and sciences.

Maybe an article could have celebrated those students who are ready to change the world.

—Mike Wagner, Irving

Courage in wrongful death penalty case

I had the opportunity to hear Glenn and Judy Cherry tell their story as they accepted the 2018 Courage Award from the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty. ("Judge recommends state spare death row inmate convicted in Hurst Putt-Putt murder," May 9)

They have been true examples of humility, selflessness, and grace in the face of unimaginable loss.

The prosecutor told the jury that the Cherrys supported the death penalty, despite their ethical and spiritual opposition and their desire to spare Paul Storey’s mother from the grief they endured.

That was a terrible miscarriage of justice.

On Tuesday, Judge Everett Young held the State accountable for this inappropriate conduct. I urge the Court of Criminal Appeals to follow.

—Aftab A. Siddiqui,

Arlington



On Nevada bears and Minnesota

A New York Times article says a warmer-than-normal winter at Pine Nut Mountain in northwestern Nevada caused bears there to leave hibernation early. ("In a warm winter, bears can't hibernate, and that's trouble," Sunday)

The report failed to say other regions in the U.S. experienced a colder-than-normal winter. Just ask the bears in Minnesota!

—R. Cargill Hall,

Arlington

Stecko missing from Casa Mañana story

How disappointing to read the three-page 60th anniversary spread on Fort Worth’s iconic Casa Mañana theater without one word included about the late, legendary former orchestra conductor, Joe Stecko.

Joe was the beloved resident conductor for 36 years beginning in 1967, touching the lives and influencing the careers of most, if not all, of the artists mentioned in the article as well as more than half the actors, directors, musicians, dancers, stage hands, staff, and volunteers who ever stepped into the limelight under the fabulous dome, as well as the thousands and thousands of patrons during his tenure.

—Silas O. Hughes Jr.,

Fort Worth

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