Letters to the Editor

Professor notices partisan split in FW; ABA gave pass to Obama nominee; Death penalty use falling; Target those with history of violence; What can we do?

California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu is interviewed in his office in San Francisco, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. A new study co-authored by Liu, a prominent Asian American judge, finds Asian Americans are well-represented among the nation's attorneys, but still missing from leadership positions in the legal profession.
California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu is interviewed in his office in San Francisco, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. A new study co-authored by Liu, a prominent Asian American judge, finds Asian Americans are well-represented among the nation's attorneys, but still missing from leadership positions in the legal profession. AP

Prof notices partisan split in FW

TCU Professor Emily M. Farris said she has noticed a suspiciously partisan division on immigration and on the failure to vote on a proposal for expanded bus service to aid lower-income and disabled residents.

In 2016, Mayor Betsy Price was named chairwoman of the Community Leaders of America’s national caucus of GOP mayors and council members. Price said: “CLA’s commitment to supporting these Republican officeholders and candidates is unrivaled, and I’m proud to continue that record of support.” Thus ended our valued nonpartisan City Council.

When the council voted against joining the Senate Bill 4 lawsuit, a large segment of residents felt betrayed and marginalized. Many disillusioned residents stand with Professor Farris’ statement: “Partisan concerns should be removed from our city politics.”

Joan Kline, Fort Worth

ABA gave pass to Obama nominee

Leonard Pitts’ column lambasted President Trump for nominating Brett Talley for a judgeship over the objections of the American Bar Association.

However, three days earlier the Wall Street Journal said the ABA gave a pass to a President Obama nominee for a judgeship, Goodwin Liu, now sitting on the California Supreme Court. Guess how much previous trial experience Judge Liu had? Try zero.

Jeff Murray, Weatherford

Death penalty use falling

A Fort Worth jury’s recent rejection of the death penalty in the trial of Miguel Angel Hernandez is further evidence of the punishment’s decline, even in a high-use area like Tarrant County.

The jury’s decision to sentence Hernandez to life in prison without parole follows a national trend in which more states are abolishing the death penalty or refusing to use it. The latest Gallup poll found public approval of the death penalty has declined to a historic low not seen since March 1972. That includes a 12-point decrease in support among Republicans, reflecting concerns about fairness.

State legislators and district attorneys can learn a lesson and save critical resources for more effective public safety measures by ending the death penalty in Texas.

Jim Webner, Fort Worth

What can we do?

After each mass shooting, I hear people say that “evil has been with us since the Garden of Eden.” While this might be the case, the snake wasn’t armed with an assault rifle. If it were, none of us would be here.

William W. Thorburn, Benbrook

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