Letters to the Editor

Texting tragedy; Toyota suppliers; Trump finds a way

Authorities investigate a deadly crash Wednesday involving a van carrying church members and a pickup on U.S. 83 outside Garner State Park in northern Uvalde County. The group of senior adults from First Baptist Church of New Braunfels, Texas, was returning from a retreat when the crash occurred, a church statement said.
Authorities investigate a deadly crash Wednesday involving a van carrying church members and a pickup on U.S. 83 outside Garner State Park in northern Uvalde County. The group of senior adults from First Baptist Church of New Braunfels, Texas, was returning from a retreat when the crash occurred, a church statement said. AP

Texting tragedy

I wonder if Colleyville state Sen. Konni Burton is reconsidering her position of banning texting while driving after reading the story of a texting driver who killed 13 seniors last week (“Driver in fatal crash admitted texting, witness says,” Saturday).

The offending driver’s “I’m sorry” comment doesn’t carry much weight.

Since the Texas House passed a bill in March banning texting while driving, the Senate has the opportunity to codify this position and send it to the governor — assuming intransigents like Burton drop their opposition.

Her position that the law would be unenforceable is nonsense; 46 states have enforceable laws against texting while driving.

In a previous letter, I asked what number of injuries and fatalities it would take for Burton to change her position.

Tragically, I hope the number is 13.

William S. Taylor,

Colleyville

Toyota suppliers

In his April 1 column, “Driving My Life Away,” Ed Wallace inaccurately suggested that Toyota’s “just in time” manufacturing system imposes “huge penalties” for suppliers who miss deadlines and carries a “huge human cost.”

In fact, Toyota will not penalize a supplier for issues that result in a delay. Rather, we will work with the supplier to understand and help address the root cause.

More broadly, safety remains a top priority at Toyota, and our commitment to safe working conditions extends to our suppliers.

We reinforce this by evaluating potential Toyota suppliers’ safety records during the selection process, performing periodic reviews of their safety performance, regularly visiting manufacturing facilities, sharing best practices and providing training materials.

Our “just in time” manufacturing, which eliminates unnecessary waste, evolved from our core value of continuous improvement.

In that same spirit, Toyota works to deepen safety processes through collaboration with our suppliers — and we will continue pursuing this vigorously.

We are committed to partnering with Toyota suppliers to ensure mutual, sustainable success.

We do not penalize performance challenges. We see them as opportunities to improve together.

Bob Young,

group vice president, Toyota Motor North America, Plano

Trump finds a way

President Trump is doing what he promised.

Yes, it will be uncomfortable for us when our favorite agencies no longer have the dollars they “need,” but Americans have always been able to find a way, large government or not.

My Irish immigrant family came through Ellis Island after a trip in the hull of a wooden boat. They were hungry enough to find a way out of the potato famine.

There were no agencies to help them, they were left to find a way.

Patricia Wachter,

Fort Worth

Correction

About 7,000 people will be in Fort Worth Friday through Sunday to attend the U.S. Concealed Carry Association’s annual Concealed Carry Expo. Due to an editing error, the dates of the meeting were incorrect in a Sunday opinion column.

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