Letters to the Editor

Trump’s speech; running for office; women’s march

President Donald Trump delivers his inaugural address after being sworn in as the 45th president of the United States during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.
President Donald Trump delivers his inaugural address after being sworn in as the 45th president of the United States during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. AP

Trump’s speech

Donald Trump’s inaugural speech was the most provocative address I’ve heard.

It was a clearly worded assessment recognizing that those who elected him expected change from the known political establishment’s ways of life to a set of steps intended to rebuild what so many voters want.

It was not a message to make his political opponents feel more comfortable, that maybe it won’t be as bad as they thought.

I am greatly impressed and encouraged that 2017 is the beginning of a year of fabulous outpourings, the positive likes of which most of us have not seen in our lives.

Dwight “D.A.” Sharpe, Aurora

 

On Friday, I heard that my country is a mess.

I reside in one of the best small towns in this large country: Grapevine, Texas. We don’t all vote the same, but we are a part of a democracy, and civility reigns (mostly).

The United States is already great. We are are inclusive, diverse and compassionate.

Colleen Butterfield,

Grapevine

 

Trump’s press secretary and his counselor Kelly Anne Conway should have ended their estimates of the size of the inauguration audience by quoting Groucho Marx: “Who are you going to believe, me or your own eyes?”

Guelma B. Hopkins,

Fort Worth

Running for office

I know and have known many honest and honorable men and women.

However, in the past two generations, few with these virtues have chosen to take part in governing our country.

No more great leaders like Roosevelt or Churchill who, in my day, were trusted and admired.

So were the owners and managers of local businesses and banks, whose lives meant helping others.

We are not going to be satisfied now with cheaters, fakers and liars.

Betty Fay, Fort Worth

Women’s march

Cynthia Allen’s op-ed piece on the women’s march does not read so much as a call for dialogue as a dismissive attempt at divisiveness. (“Women’s March on Washington won’t be open to all women,” Friday)

Abortion is abhorrent, and the painful impact on a woman’s life is undeniable.

We must work to guarantee unfettered access to birth control for women who need it, regardless of ability to pay.

Want to reduce abortion? Birth control.

Want to reduce child abuse and neglect? Birth control.

I would like to see government entities as interested in providing birth control as they are in when, where and why one seeks abortion, where one takes a potty break and under what circumstances one can obtain a divorce

Judith Caldwell,

North Richland Hills

 

In 1968, I marched with the fledgling feminist movement in San Francisco, Calif.

With baby daughter on my back, I joined some incredible people on a mission. These activists took on a mighty challenge: the raising up and advancement of women in society.

These activists knew very well why we marched and what drove the feminist movement into existence.

Perhaps Cynthia Allen and the “new feminists” should ponder these things that were and are real and earnest. We will not go back.

Jackie Bell, River Oaks

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