Letters to the Editor

Telemedicine; bathroom bill; childhood arrivals

Dr. Terry Rabinowitz, right, talks with nurse Leslie Orelup at Helen Porter Nursing Home in Burlington, Vt. Doctors have used video feeds and other technology for years to treat patients in remote locations. But experts say growing smartphone use and customer demand are fueling a rapid expansion of telemedicine into everyday care the family doctor used to handle.
Dr. Terry Rabinowitz, right, talks with nurse Leslie Orelup at Helen Porter Nursing Home in Burlington, Vt. Doctors have used video feeds and other technology for years to treat patients in remote locations. But experts say growing smartphone use and customer demand are fueling a rapid expansion of telemedicine into everyday care the family doctor used to handle. AP

Telemedicine

I agree with Dr. Jon Thomas that Texas lawmakers should pass a bill to join 18 other states that have approved the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. (Letters, Jan. 5)

The Texas Sunset Advisory Commission, in its recent review of the Texas Medical Board, also recommended that the Texas Medical Board support passage of the IMLC.

Joining the IMLC streamlines physician licensing across state borders so that conditions/diseases that are appropriate for telemedicine visits could be handled by a board-certified physician in another state.

There are many different types of telemedicine, and I encourage readers to educate themselves by reviewing information readily available at reliable sources.

Thirty-five Texas counties have zero physicians, and residents struggle to receive medical care.

Telemedicine isn’t the total answer to the problem, but it will help.

Elva Roy, Arlington

Bathroom bill

Lt . Gov. Dan Patrick and others in the Texas Legislature should get their heads out of the toilet, stop obsessing on pants zippers and get on with important business instead of manufacturing and promoting wedge issues.

We have had transgender kids forever. I am almost 70 years old, and we had a transgender kid in our school.

This child had surgery to remove “body parts” in the summer between the 7th and 8th grade. He was in the boys gym classes until the surgery and then used the girls bathroom and was in our gym class.

None of us were harmed. The deck of cards life dealt this kid was harsh enough without politicians making too much of it.

Patrick should get over it. Transgender individuals are just that: Transgender.

This hullabaloo over what bathroom they use is detrimental. It shows that the lieutenant governor is a small-minded, petty politician instead of a leader.

Get over it. Go to work. Fix our school financing. Solve our transportation problems.

Make our world safer. Get your head out of the toilet and do your job as a responsible adult elected official.

Faith Chatham,

Arlington

Childhood arrivals

DREAMers are the sons and daughters of our country. It helps no one if the government decides to deport them after promising to protect them.

With over 100,000 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients in Texas alone, we have to stand tall or else we will see teachers disappear from schools, nurses from ERs and students from classrooms.

Taking away DACA would cripple the Texas economy. To put it frankly, we can’t afford that type of short-sighted policy-making.

Many members of Congress have a problem with DACA because it was passed by an executive order and not through legislation. The BRIDGE Act would take DACA and turn it into a legislative type of relief.

It doesn’t give these young people citizenship or amnesty — it just lets them keep legally working, paying taxes, going to school and helping our economy grow without fear of deportation.

If Congress understands we need to protect these young people but don’t like the DACA policy, they should pass the BRIDGE Act.

Matthew Hall, Fort Worth

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