Letters to the Editor

YMLA football, stalled bridges, TCU diversity

South Hills Scorpions Tylan Wallace (2) bang for extra yards as YMLA Deuante Hartin (11) makes the stop as South Hills plays Young Men's Leadership Academy at Clark stadium in Fort Worth, TX, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016.
South Hills Scorpions Tylan Wallace (2) bang for extra yards as YMLA Deuante Hartin (11) makes the stop as South Hills plays Young Men's Leadership Academy at Clark stadium in Fort Worth, TX, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016. mfaulkner@star-telegram.com

YMLA football

The editor got it wrong on this one. Young Men’s Leadership Academy in the Stop Six neighborhood is a magnet school of 120 boys competing against 5A schools with enrollments of 1,060 to 2,099 students. Most 5A schools have more than 120 boys in their football program. (“YMLA’s Wildcats play by UIL’s necessary rules,” Nov. 4 editorial)

This unfair UIL regulation puts magnet schools in the classification of the largest school in the district. It defies logic and takes all the fun out of football both for YMLA and the schools they play.

The former orthopedic surgeon for the Dallas Mavericks called this “an absolute disaster” and said the UIL has “lost its way on this one.” Even an unnamed District 7-5A coach said the YMLA kids have to make the best of a bad situation. Imagine a 150-pound YMLA nose guard who competes against 320-pound linemen.

Wake up, Star-Telegram, and be an advocate for our high school football teams. But most importantly, wake up UIL and change this bad rule that penalizes our kids who just want to play football.

Harry Thompson, Bedford

Stalled bridges

Is that some kind of dark humor? (“Stalled Panther Island bridges can’t be good sign,” Nov. 1 editorial)

The Trinity River Vision Central City project was approved by the City Council 12 years ago with a price estimated at $360 million. The taxpayer portion was to be $26.6 million for bridges financed by bonds.

Then came the TIF (expanded twice), then came the first price hike to $435 million, then came the second price hike to $735 million then came the third price hike to $908 million.

Now the Fort Worth taxpayers are on the hook for over $350 million from bonds and the TIF. The flood control cost is all downstream as a fix for straightening the channel.

Just as scandalous, perhaps, is that the City Council and Tarrant County commissioners don’t seem to care about the final cost.

This isn’t an expensive boondoggle, it’s a monumental pork-barrel project and fraud on taxpayers.

Clyde Picht, Fort Worth

TCU diversity

Sunday’s letters on TCU diversity missed an important idea: We’ve redefined the word diversity.

It used to be a description of the makeup of a population. Now it’s a goal to be attained.

If you don’t have enough of a minority in a certain field, you shouldn’t alter admission standards to attain a government-mandated diversity goal. Using different standards raises mistrust of minority performance in that field and increases racism.

Let minorities earn their degrees under the same rules as majority students.

Yes, there is often a lack of a certain minority in a field, but changing standards does more harm than good.

Those missing minorities are often the product of family problems as they struggle to overcome years of counterproductive government intrusion, not from lack of ability or opportunity.

Trust the minority student to overcome obstacles as you would a majority student.

The minority students deserve respect, and you don’t respect someone by assuming they can’t meet everyone else’s standards.

Guilt over past mistreatment is understandable, but giving special treatment often breeds resentment and lack of confidence.

Curt Lampkin, Azle

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