Letters to the Editor

Letters: Readers speak out about election

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump debate during the third presidential debate at UNLV in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016.
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump debate during the third presidential debate at UNLV in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. AP

Donald Trump is correct. The election is rigged, but it is rigged so the person with the most votes wins!

That’s the way it has always been. Thank goodness

Ronnie Martin, Hurst

 

If Donald Trump wants to stop being ridiculed, then he should stop being ridiculous.

Paul R. Schattman,

Arlington

 

After the debate, I am amazed but not surprised to see the headlines (“Trump refuses to say if he will accept election results,” Thursday)

What this election boils down to is, which direction do we want to go? Do we wait four more years of Obama’s failing policies, or do we want a president who will take our country in a better direction?

Mary Clark, Bedford

 

FUD marketing is what marketeers resort to when they don’t have a competitive product. In such a case, one has to resort to creating Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD) about the competitor.

This is what the Republicans have done to Hillary Clinton for the past 25 years. The Republicans have kept up their FUD marketing campaign against Clinton for that long because they don’t have anyone as smart and hard-working to compete against her.

Don’t let the Republicans’ FUD campaign against Clinton keep you from voting for the best qualified candidate for president.

Laurin McLaurin,

Benbrook

 

The media are attacking Trump for saying he will have to wait and see before committing to the results of the election.

Well, guess what? Al Gore refused to accept the election results against George W. Bush and even sued to have them overturned.

So Trump isn’t doing anything the Democrats haven’t already done.

Robert M. Moon,

Fort Worth

 

Not much was said in the debates about international affairs.

You would think that this would be a problem for many Americans, considering it has implications on both our economy and our national security.

Before we can have an open discussion about the problem, we need to establish there is one.

According to a 2011 article by John Norris in The Washington Post, the average American believes we should be spending 10 percent of the federal budget on international affairs.

This is very problematic, because the actual portion of the federal budget is 1 percent.

John Muscolini,

Fort Worth

  Comments