Editorials

Big D thwarted on ads at Little C airport

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Cleveland Cavaliers’ LeBron James, center, greets crowd during a parade celebrating the basketball team’s NBA championship.
Cleveland Cavaliers’ LeBron James, center, greets crowd during a parade celebrating the basketball team’s NBA championship. AP

Dallas is big enough to fight its own battles, but we must at least give a cheer for its rejected efforts to advertise itself at the Cleveland airport as delegates arrive for the Republican National Convention this month.

The people of Big D have never been shy.

They narrowly lost the 2014 competition to be the 2016 convention’s host city. Among the selling points was that 90 percent of the delegate hotel rooms would have been within a mile of the convention site.

“We are markedly a much better convention city,” Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings told The Dallas Morning News. And that was the implication of the planned ads.

But Cleveland airport officials have rejected the plan, saying they couldn’t accommodate everyone who wanted to buy advertising during the convention. That’s a feeble attempt to cover a small-minded decision.

Or, as Dallas Convention & Visitors Bureau President Philip Jones told The Morning News, “It’s clear to me that they are a little more sensitive about delegates staying an hour away in Sandusky than we thought.”

You’d think the home to professional basketball’s championship team and “world-class arts, culture, rock and roll, and a nationally recognized culinary scene” would be able to stand the heat.

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