Editorials

Younger Texans among the most diverse

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Students walk through the University of Texas at Austin campus in Austin, Texas. This giant flagship campus — once so slow to integrate — is now awash in color, among the most diverse the country if not the world.
Students walk through the University of Texas at Austin campus in Austin, Texas. This giant flagship campus — once so slow to integrate — is now awash in color, among the most diverse the country if not the world. AP

Diversity is the new normal for young Texans.

A new age group breakdown, using Census data, paints a colorful picture of the state’s population, especially in the younger generations.

The 2015 data show that Texans under the age of 19 have the most diverse demographics, with 33 percent white, 12 percent black and 49 percent Hispanic.

The next age group, 20-39, has similar numbers.

Overall, the state is 43 percent white, 12.5 percent black and 39 percent Hispanic. The latter two are on the rise while the white percentage has slowly decreased since 2010.

If the trend continues, Texas will join California and New Mexico as states with Hispanics as the largest racial group.

The diversity isn’t just in border areas. Tarrant County had a 15 percent growth of Hispanic population while Denton County had a 23 percent growth since 2010.

A Rice University study crowned Houston the most ethnically diverse large metropolitan area in the United States in 2012.

Diversity should be welcomed.

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