Editorials

Stockyards district is a council decision

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Stockyards area expands around intersection of North Main Street and Exchange Avenue.
Stockyards area expands around intersection of North Main Street and Exchange Avenue. Fort Worth Star-Telegram

The Zoning Commission’s action Wednesday on the size of a historic district for the Fort Worth Stockyards was very significant — but it was definitely only a preliminary round in a bigger fight.

City Council members have made clear that they will be the ultimate decision-makers on Stockyards development.

That applies to plans now being refined for a $175 million development by California’s Majestic Realty and the Fort Worth Hickman family, but it also applies to regulatory recommendations from city boards like the Zoning Commission.

The council can do what the Zoning Commission recommends or something completely different.

A council vote on proposed boundaries for the Stockyards historic district is set for April 5.

On Wednesday, the Zoning Commission agreed with historic preservationists who advocate a 139-acre district that takes in the heart of the Stockyards area and expands to the east and south.

The council previously proposed a much smaller, 60-acre district in the central Stockyards.

Yet to come at City Hall is completion of a “form-based code” that’s expected to set tight guidelines on what Stockyards development can look like.

The elected council is where decision-making power should be.

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