Editorials

Fantasy sports giants split on Texas

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

FanDuel advertising covers the post for an NCAA college basketball matchup in the FanDuel Legends Classic consolation game, at the Barclays Center in New York.
FanDuel advertising covers the post for an NCAA college basketball matchup in the FanDuel Legends Classic consolation game, at the Barclays Center in New York. AP

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton got it right Jan. 19 when he said big-time daily fantasy sports betting is illegal in Texas.

Now it turns out that one of the nation’s two big online daily fantasy sports operations apparently agrees — but, sadly, the other one doesn’t.

FanDuel and rival DraftKings hold the lion’s share of the multibillion-dollar daily fantasy sports market.

FanDuel said Friday that it will stop accepting paid entries for cash prizes in Texas starting May 2. Later Friday, DraftKings sued Paxton in a bid to continue operating in the state.

Long term, the outcome could end up the same for both: a push to change Texas law.

Two key parts of that law led to Paxton’s opinion, one that says it’s gambling if chance plays a role in the wager, and another that allows awards only to “actual contestants” in a game of skill.

Paxton says chance plays a big role in daily fantasy sports, and the “actual contestants” are the sports players on the field. Lawmakers could change those definitions.

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