Editorials

We may disagree with Bernie Sanders on many things, but he’s got this one right

TCU student explains why he is protesting Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders stopped by Fort Worth, TX for a campaign rally on April 25, 2019. TCU student Anthony Georgiev explains why he and other students are with him protesting Bernie Sanders and are against Sander's stance on issues such as free college.
Up Next
Bernie Sanders stopped by Fort Worth, TX for a campaign rally on April 25, 2019. TCU student Anthony Georgiev explains why he and other students are with him protesting Bernie Sanders and are against Sander's stance on issues such as free college.

Revolution was in the Burnett Park air Thursday long before Bernie Sanders wrapped up several speakers’ litanies of what ails American society, followed by the playing of John Lennon’s “Power to the People.”

Sanders and his supporters cited health care, racism, sexism, homophobia, climate change, low wages, extreme gaps in wealth, tax cuts for the rich, nonexistent taxes for big corporations and more.

Folks on the right might actually agree with some of the societal shortcomings noted from the dais at Sanders’ presidential rally here. They’d likely take a dim view, however, of Sanders’ prescriptions, or certainly their probable price tags.

But the fervor of the Fort Worth crowd and its obvious devotion to Sanders would appear to make the 77-year-old Vermont senator a force to be reckoned with again, this time in a much-more-crowded 2020 presidential field, after having given Hillary Clinton the run of her life in 2016.

What any rally observer of any stripe might have agreed with, though, is Sanders’ call for a revolution in voter turnout — saying we do not have the luxury of not being involved in the political process.

We second that.

Texas is looked at these days as something of a swing state in 2020, after Beto O’Rourke not only gave incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz a run for his money in the 2018 midterms, but actually outpolled Cruz in historically beet-red Tarrant County.

That’s why Sanders made a point of stumping in Texas, becoming the third Democratic presidential contender already to do so in these parts, after California Sen. Kamala Harris and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper.

The lesson of Sen. Sanders’ visit here, then, is to become involved, no matter your beliefs. Whether you like the status quo or want to rock the boat, it behooves you to become politically active. Here. And now.

It’s especially true with local elections underway — early voting now through Tuesday, April 30, and Election Day May 4 — for such things as mayor, council, school district and the Tarrant Regional Water District.

The Star-Telegram has created an online voter guide to help you sort out the candidates and issues for Fort Worth and Arlington mayor and council seats; Fort Worth ISD school board races; and the Tarrant Regional Water District board, which oversees the Central City Flood Control Project, which is the precursor to the planned Panther Island development on the north fringe of downtown.

In addition, The Star-Telegram has published our Editorial Board’s recommendations in the Fort Worth and Arlington mayor races, the Fort Worth council contests, Fort Worth ISD school board races, and the Tarrant Regional Water District board.

Of course, what will get the lion’s share of political attention in the next year and a half will be the 2020 presidential race. And it will no doubt bring more contenders to Texas and the Fort Worth area, which have become an unexpected battleground for what Democratic candidate Joe Biden this past week called “a battle for the soul of this nation.”

Bernie Sanders and his other speakers and supporters clearly feel that way. Do you?

The thing is, those presidential caravans will come and go, but you’ll still be here — and in a position to shape the community you live in during this local election.

As the man said, not being involved is a luxury we can’t afford.

  Comments