Editorials

Fort Worth May 4 election: Here’s who we recommend for City Council

Not sure what Texas’ elected politicians actually do? Here are explanations

Railroad commissioner? County Court-at-Law judge? County tax assessor-collector? When you head to the polls, know what the responsibilities are of the positions on your ballot. Here's a brief explainer on some of the key elected positions in Texas
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Railroad commissioner? County Court-at-Law judge? County tax assessor-collector? When you head to the polls, know what the responsibilities are of the positions on your ballot. Here's a brief explainer on some of the key elected positions in Texas

DISTRICT 6

(Southwest Fort Worth.)

Much of Fort Worth is well-represented at City Hall, but residents of south and southwest Fort Worth Districts 6 and 8 deserve a change.

In District 6, Daryl Davis II, pastor and headmaster of a church and school, brings new energy and new thinking that can better address the needs of this changing district.

Davis has a financial background and has shown his devotion to the community through his work at the Presbyterian Night Shelter and YMCA. He talks about giving voice to the voiceless in this increasingly diverse district and supports the district’s need for increased public transit.

Incumbent Jungus Jordan has served 14 years. He was absent without explanation when his vote was needed for public transit funding. He also voted against removing Confederate States President Jefferson Davis’ name from a city park.

Daryl Davis II offers a welcome change for City Council District 6.

DISTRICT 8

(Near east, near southeast and south Fort Worth.)

Pastor and court clerk Chris Nettles grew up in Morningside Heights and brings a fresh approach to the intractable problems of near south and southeast Fort Worth.

Residents of the 76104 ZIP code die younger than anyone else in the state, according to a recent study. That isn’t the fault of City Council, but Nettles has a passion for change that is needed.

Nettles, an impressive candidate for mayor in 2017, is particularly interested in working on economic development.

Four-term council member Kelly Allen Gray is reliable. But Chris Nettles offers new hope for a better District 8.

DISTRICT 3

(Southwest and parts of west Fort Worth.)

Brian Byrd showed what a new councilmember can accomplish in a rookie term, rallying community support to improve the Las Vegas Trail neighborhood. He argued to hold the line on the city property tax rate, particularly important in his predominantly conservative district.

Brian Byrd strongly deserves a second term in District 3.

DISTRICT 4

(East and part of north Fort Worth.)

Cary Moon is a lightning rod for both praise and criticism. Often the council contrarian and the only “no” vote, he also claims he has passed more new ordinances than others.

As chair of the council internal audit committee, he helped the city recover money and has argued to keep taxes low. Not every neighborhood in District 4 reflects his conservative views. But overall, Fort Worth is well served by having Cary Moon on council.

DISTRICT 5

(Southeast and far east Fort Worth)

Gyna Bivens was first elected in 2013 and shows an impressive command of this district.

She has led revitalization of the Cavile Place neighborhood. Her bipartisan work with Housing Secretary Ben Carson and leadership in the National League of Cities has brought Fort Worth national attention.

Gyna Bivens has well earned another term.

DISTRICT 7

(West and northwest Fort Worth.)

Dennis Shingleton is one of the most effective council members and takes a strong role in city planning, whether it’s to iron out conflicts surrounding the Botanic Garden and Dickies Arena or to manage new neighborhoods to the north.

A challenger, Michael Matos, focuses on specific neighborhood needs and on Arlington Heights flooding but does not have Shingleton’s citywide vision or executive experience. District 7 has excellent leadership in Dennis Shingleton.

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