Editorials

Philanthropy Day: Thanks are hardly adequate

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Doug Hawthorne, left, then-CEO of Texas Health Resources, with Helen and Jimmy Payton at the 2011 dedication of the Payton Family Lobby and Helen Payton Chapel at Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford.
Doug Hawthorne, left, then-CEO of Texas Health Resources, with Helen and Jimmy Payton at the 2011 dedication of the Payton Family Lobby and Helen Payton Chapel at Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford.

Money.

You can do a lot of good deeds without a whole lot of it, but once you move very far away from one-on-one kindnesses into larger-scale projects, you need to pay to keep things going.

That often means you need help from people who are willing to put their money to work to do good things.

Fort Worth and Tarrant County are extremely fortunate to have their share — to be honest, probably more than their share — of generous people.

We owe a lot to their kindness. Wealthy individuals, families, foundations, organizations and local businesses give of their money and their talents, very often without fanfare.

They help our community have finer things like the arts, social events, institutions, medical facilities, event venues and more, down to an abundance of organizations that help individuals in desperate need.

On Thursday, an event in Fort Worth will formally recognize some of the givers who make this all happen.

The Fort Worth Metro Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals will hold its 2016 National Philanthropy Day Awards luncheon at Cendera Center, 3600 Benbrook Highway. This is the event’s 36th year.

Each of the honorees has an impressive story too long to repeat here. Even a quick glimpse is humbling.

Helen and Jimmy Payton have deep roots in Euless and a long history of service to Northeast Tarrant County. The lobby and chapel at Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford are part of their continuing legacy.

Charlie Powell, president of Ciera Bank’s Fort Worth region, and James Powell, assistant counsel for transportation at the North Central Texas Council of Governments, were the first father-son team to co-chair the United Way of Tarrant County’s annual campaign. Their 2013-14 campaign benefited a wide range of local causes.

Bill McLeRoy, senior principal at The Whitestone Group, will receive the Ben Franklin Award as outstanding professional fundraising executive of the year. His efforts have supported activities ranging from the arts, human services and healthcare to offender reentry.

Motor Home Specialist, a family business in Alvarado owned by Doug and Sharon O’Bannon, will receive the award for outstanding philanthropic corporation for support of Ronald McDonald House of Fort Worth, Cook Children’s Health Foundation, Meals on Wheels and Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund.

Southlake Women’s Club, recipient of the outstanding philanthropic organization award, started in 1985 and has raised more than $2 million for more than 50 causes, including Southlake’s Art in the Square.

The Miles Foundation, named the year’s outstanding philanthropic foundation, has provided more than $15.5 million for initiatives to strengthen parents and families.

Breanna Brietske, the outstanding youth in philanthropy award recipient and a 2016 Fort Worth Country Day graduate, created the Art for a Cause student art competition to benefit Ronald McDonald House of Fort Worth.

We can’t match your deeds. We can only say thank you.

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