Editorials

Food allergies shouldn’t hinder trick-or-treating

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The Fairmount neighborhood had a Teal Pumpkin Paint Party at the Fairmount Community Library in 2015.
The Fairmount neighborhood had a Teal Pumpkin Paint Party at the Fairmount Community Library in 2015. Star-Telegram

Parents who have children with food allergies must dread Halloween.

Too many unknowns lurk behind closed doors, and it’s hard to explain why a kid can’t go trick-or-treating.

Halloween should be available for all kids, and teal pumpkins allow that.

The Teal Pumpkin Project, a Food Allergy Research and Education initiative, provides the opportunity for kids with food allergies to trick-or-treat. But instead of candy, they get nonfood items.

The colored pumpkins identify households with the trinkets, as indicated on an interactive participator map.

Houses all across North Texas are participating, and you can too. All you need is teal paint, a pumpkin and some nonfood items like glow bracelets or spider rings to make sure all kids get to enjoy the night.

Signs are available, if you don’t have paint handy, but giving all kids a safe, fun Halloween is the goal. The Teal Pumpkin Project is one simple way to do that.

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