Editorials

Scams don’t just dupe elderly

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The Internal Revenue Service doesn’t contact people via phone regarding audits without sending a mailed notice.
The Internal Revenue Service doesn’t contact people via phone regarding audits without sending a mailed notice. AP

An Internal Revenue Service scam grabbed more than $73,000 from Fort Worth residents. Bogus squirrel exterminators conned Farmers Branch homeowners.

We read these stories and think: I would never fall for it.

Like watching a cooking show and declaring you could do a better job, theory isn’t the same as reality.

Scammers don’t just target little old ladies, and the elderly don’t fall for scams as much as a younger generation — millennials.

Tech-savvy youth may pride themselves on knowing that a Nigerian prince doesn’t really need money or that a free cruise trip isn’t really free.

That arrogance, along with job-search desperation, sometimes leads millennials to fall victim to newer, less traditional scams.

Scammers use social media like Instagram and Facebook, sometimes even creating false profiles under friends’ names.

Nobody is invincible, so stay diligent. If it seems too good to be true, it’s most likely a scam — even if you are young and savvy.

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