Editorials

Baylor’s damage control needs damage control

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Patty Crawford, Baylor University’s first full-time Title IX coordinator has resigned over a disagreement in her role overseeing changes at the Baptist school following claims it mishandled sexual assault cases over several years.
Patty Crawford, Baylor University’s first full-time Title IX coordinator has resigned over a disagreement in her role overseeing changes at the Baptist school following claims it mishandled sexual assault cases over several years. AP

Patty Crawford, who resigned Monday as Baylor University’s Title IX coordinator, had a few words for the university.

We do too.

Back in May, when the Pepper Hamilton law firm published its scathing report of Baylor’s handling of campus sexual abuse complaints, Crawford was supposed to be a leader in implementing better responses.

She says she wasn’t allowed to do so, that Baylor officials interfered. So she resigned.

We don’t know what happened behind closed doors, or how reports of film rights negotiations came into the picture, but her leaving doesn’t look good for Baylor.

Neither does the way officials are handling an ongoing Title IX lawsuit or an incident involving a “football coaching staff member” berating a rape victim and advocate after a speech.

Which is a shame, since Baylor was off to the right start in its damage control. The university cleaned house, mandated more than 100 policy changes and created two task forces.

But as Baylor’s efforts to repair the damage continue, it only seems to get worse. Officials are drawing more negative attention with their interference and public communication.

Quickly finding a Title IX coordinator replacement helps, but Baylor needs to get its act together and work toward putting out the fire instead of adding fuel to it.

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