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Update: 80 mph winds toss planes, damage buildings in DFW, leaving many without power

Early morning storm causes damage in North Texas

A severe storm swept through the Dallas-Fort Worth area early Wednesday morning. The storm produced sheet rain and winds up to 81 mph. Near DFW Airport downed trees and other wind damage was evident.
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A severe storm swept through the Dallas-Fort Worth area early Wednesday morning. The storm produced sheet rain and winds up to 81 mph. Near DFW Airport downed trees and other wind damage was evident.

Overnight storms early Wednesday morning that left a trail of damage across North Texas made way for sunny skies by the afternoon and clear weather that was predicted to continue for the next few days.

The storms showed up with a bang in the early morning hours, packing straight-line winds up to 80 mph that knocked out power lines and trees in the area.

Not far from where the 80 mph wind gust was reported, small planes were blown around the tarmac at Grand Prairie Municipal Airport.

There was also damage to an Amazon building near the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, according to news reports. The National Weather Service said a 78 mph wind gust was reported at the airport at 4:53 a.m.

Video filmed near the entrance of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport shows powerful winds pull the roof of the Amazon fulfillment center.

In Johnson County, damage was scattered across the county from homes in Godley to Cleburne, where one woman was injured when storms knocked over a modular home. Outside of Godley, the winds were powerful enough to twist power lines and the utility towers that held them.

And at the Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, a wind gust of 75 mph was reported at 4:27 a.m.

National Weather Service meteorologist Ted Ryan said there have been no confirmed tornadoes.

But storm sirens sounded at 4:30 a.m. due to the high winds, causing confusion among some residents in Fort Worth who thought it meant a tornado was imminent.

Fort Worth’s Office of Emergency Management released a statement Wednesday afternoon, saying the city experienced many downed trees and power lines resulting in street closures and power outages that impacted almost 10,000 people.

“We can’t stress enough that the sirens are ‘outdoor warning sirens’ and not ‘tornado sirens,’” the statement said.

Sirens also were went off in Richland Hills and Grand Prairie because of the strong storms.

“We’ve had reports of 18-wheelers blown over in Wise County,” said NWS meteorologist Steve Fano.

A severe thunderstorm watch was canceled for North and Central Texas as the storms moved into East Texas. Skies cleared and rain ended by mid-morning in Tarrant County.

The rest of the week was predicted to be sunny with temperatures in the high 50s.

To the west of Fort Worth along the Interstate 20 corridor toward Abilene, a high wind warning will be in effect until 10 p.m. Wednesday where winds will blow from 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 60 mph.

At 6:45 p.m. Wednesday, Oncor reported fewer than 28,000 residents were without power in Tarrant and Dallas counties.

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