Elections

How Tarrant County is reaching out to the disabled to help them vote independently

The Americans with Disabilities Act requires that state and local governments provide equal access to all aspects of voting, which include registration and accessible polling places and machines.
The Americans with Disabilities Act requires that state and local governments provide equal access to all aspects of voting, which include registration and accessible polling places and machines. mfaulkner@star-telegram.com

If you don’t see well enough to read what is on the ballot or if you can’t hold it in your hand, there are ways to get out and vote.

Early voting started Monday and continues through Nov. 2. Election Day is Nov. 6.

The Americans with Disabilities Act requires that state and local governments provide equal access to all aspects of voting, which include registration and accessible polling places and machines.

The systems are equipped with headphones so that a blind person can listen to the ballot selections by turning a wheel to hear each choice. There are keys for confirming the selections and for casting the completed ballot.

Curbside voting is also available for people who have difficulty standing for a long period of time, said Tarrant County elections administrator Heider Garcia.

Signs near handicapped parking spaces have a special button that alerts election workers that someone needs assistance. Workers can bring a ballot outside so that the person can vote without getting out of the car.

Garcia said the special signs for curbside voting were made after someone complained that the county wasn’t doing enough to assist voters.

“I think we can do more outreach. I think there is a growing awareness and a growing demand,” Garcia said.

Elizabeth Campbell: 817-390-7696, @fwstliz

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