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Watch Colorado firefighters work to rescue owl dangling from fishing line

Watch Colorado firefighters work to rescue owl dangling from fishing line

A Great Horned Owl was dangling above a Colorado lake after it became caught in a fishing line, officials said. Video shows firefighters and parks and wildlife officers saving the bird.
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A Great Horned Owl was dangling above a Colorado lake after it became caught in a fishing line, officials said. Video shows firefighters and parks and wildlife officers saving the bird.

A great horned owl was caught in a fishing line strung between trees near a Colorado lake early Thursday, appearing to hang almost lifelessly from one wing, video shows.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials and West Metro Fire Rescue from Lakewood, Colorado, responded to the female owl in need of help at Harriman Lake Park, officials said on Twitter.

The firefighters slowly extended a ladder from their firetruck toward the bird, as she remained motionless, video shows. One of the three rescuers in a box at the end of the ladder then reached out with a piece of fabric to capture the owl, but she attempted to fly away, video shows.

Finally, they were able to hold the owl and clipped the string to free her wing, video shows. With the bird in tow, firefighters pulled the ladder back to the truck.

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Birds of Prey Foundation, an animal rehabilitation organization in Broomfield, Colorado, then took in the owl, officials said on Twitter. The owl suffered soft tissue injuries, but the foundation won’t know the full extent of the damage for a couple of weeks, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

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Birds of Prey Foundation in Broomfield, Colorado, is rehabilitating a female Great Horned Owl rescued from a fishing line. Photo by Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

The owl will be treated with an anti-inflammatory and allowed to rest for a few weeks before testing her healing progress in a flight cage, officials said in a tweet.

“Anglers need to be diligent with picking up any excess fishing line,” Colorado Parks and Wildlife said in a tweet.

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Chacour Koop is a Real-Time reporter based in Kansas City. Previously, he reported for the Associated Press, Galveston County Daily News and Daily Herald in Chicago.
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