Fort Worth

She was found in a shallow grave five years ago. But what was her name?

Five years after a woman's remains were found in a shallow grave in west Fort Worth, police are still trying to identify her.
Five years after a woman's remains were found in a shallow grave in west Fort Worth, police are still trying to identify her. Courtesy/ Fort Worth Police Department

For years, she's been known only as Jane Doe.

Her skeletal remains were found in March 2013 in a shallow grave in far west Fort Worth.

Investigators know she's a homicide victim.

They know what she was wearing when buried.

Now, they hope a composite generated from her DNA might prompt someone to recognize her and reveal her name.

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A Phenotype Report, created by Parabon NanoLabs, predicting the appearance of a woman whose skeletal remains were found buried in a shallow grave in March 2013. Courtesy of the Fort Worth Police Department

Someone from a construction crew called police on the morning of March 20, 2013, after finding a human skull while digging in woods northwest of Calmont Avenue and Altamere Drive.

Other remains were later unearthed by a team led by Dana Austin, a forensic anthropologist for the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office.

The Medical Examiner's Office determined the remains belonged to a Latina, 21 to 35 years of age, 4 feet 9 inches to 5 feet 4 inches tall and with a small frame.

She had layered, long, wavy brown hair, up to 13-inches long.

A dental bridge on three of her upper teeth replaced a missing lateral incisor — dental work that investigators believe was done in the U.S.

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Police say the woman had been wearing pink-and blue-striped pajama or lounge pants with a multicolored print blouse when buried. Courtesy of the Fort Worth Police Department

She wore pink-and blue-striped pajama or lounge pants with a multicolored print blouse.

Officials believe the woman was likely killed in the fall of 2012. They are not releasing her cause of death.

Officials have sought the public's help before in identifying the woman. They released photographs of a clay facial reconstruction using the woman's real teeth in June 2013.

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A clay facial reconstruction using the woman's real teeth was previously publicized by the Police Department but did not lead investigators to her identity. Courtesy of the Fort Worth Police Department

Most recently, the department sought to have a composite created of the woman through Parabon NanoLabs.

The Virginia-based company uses analysis of DNA samples to predict someone's physical appearance, including ancestry and hair and eye color.

Based on the company's analysis, the Latina likely had light brown or fair skin color, brown or black eyes and black hair. She had little, if any, freckles, they determined.

Homicide Detective Kyle Sullivan previously speculated that the woman may have been from out of state or living a high-risk lifestyle that made it less likely for her disappearance to be noticed.

"Out of sight, out of mind," he had told the Star-Telegram.

Anyone with information about the woman's identity is asked to call 817-392-4330.

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