Education

TCU data analysis corrects S-T findings on percentage of black males who are athletes

How white is TCU? A look at the numbers compared to similar schools

Take a quick look at the diversity breakdown of TCU's student body, compared to five universities it has previously listed as comparable institutions.
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Take a quick look at the diversity breakdown of TCU's student body, compared to five universities it has previously listed as comparable institutions.

About 34 percent of undergraduate black men at TCU are scholarship athletes, according to figures released by the university on Wednesday, a significantly lower number than the Star-Telegram reported in April.

TCU compiled the data in response to an April 12 article in the Star-Telegram that said 70 percent of the undergraduate black men on campus are recruited athletes.

The Star-Telegram calculated its numbers using a combination of TCU’s student factbook and athlete rosters online, as well as athletes’ social media accounts and interviews of athletes in which they self-identified. If there was any doubt, the athlete was not included in the count.

The school's data, based on students' self-reports, found 33.5 percent of TCU's 218 undergraduate black male students were on athletic scholarships.

The school is working to improve its diversity after an outcry in October 2016, when the hashtag #BeingAMinorityatTCU went viral and students presented a list of demands to the administration.

In response, TCU created a chief inclusion officer and made a standing committee for diversity and inclusion. Other reforms include additional community scholarships and initiatives to hire more diverse faculty.

"We know we have a responsibility to create an environment where faculty, staff and students from a variety of backgrounds can thrive, and where they can challenge their intellects and experiences with mutual respect," said Darron Turner, the chief inclusion officer.

"That’s us living out our core values, including academic achievement, personal freedom and integrity, and the dignity and respect of the individual. That’s the foundation of who we are as an institution. In recent months, we’ve enhanced efforts to educate faculty, staff and students about cultural awareness, encourage diversity in faculty/staff recruitment and hiring, and set realistic milestones for continued efforts, among others. We have a long way to go, but we’re confident we’re moving in the right direction."



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