Dallas

Fallen heroes: Details about the 5 officers killed in Dallas

Star-Telegram

A Dallas ISD police officer adjusts a black tape over his badge in Dallas on Friday, the day after five officers were killed.
A Dallas ISD police officer adjusts a black tape over his badge in Dallas on Friday, the day after five officers were killed. Star-Telegram

The names and stories of the five officers killed in the mass shootings in Dallas emerged on Thursday:

Lorne Ahrens, 48. A senior corporal and 14-year veteran of the Dallas police force, he lived in Burleson with his wife, Katrina, who is a detective from the Crimes Against Persons division, according to the Dallas Morning News. They have two children, ages 10 and 8. Steve Stribley, a state Fraternal Order of Police vice president and Dallas patrol officer, told the DMN Ahrens was “a greatly respected veteran of the department."

Michael Krol, 40. A nine-year veteran of the DPD, he moved to Texas from Michigan. “He was living a dream of being a police officer,” Susan Ehlke, Krol’s mother, told WXYZ in Detroit. “[He] just turned 40 in April. He knew the danger of the job but he never shied away from his duty as a police officer.”

Residents pay their respects at a makeshift memorial at Dallas police department headquarters in honor of the five officers who were killed Thursday in an ambush-style attack.

Michael Smith, 55. He served as an Army Ranger and went on to attend the Lamar Institute of Technology. He joined the Dallas police force in 1989 and was an exceptional father to two young girls, his brother-in-law told WFAA.

Brent Thompson, 43. The first Dallas Area Rapid Transit officer killed in the line of duty joined DART in 2009 and “was a great officer,” DART Chief James D. Spiller told CNN on Friday. Thompson got married two weeks ago to a felllow DART officer.

Patrick Zamarippa, 32. A 2001 graduate of Paschal High School, Zamarippa was a young father and war veteran who served three tours in Iraq. The Dallas police officer was described by friends and relatives as a “gentleman” who loved his country and the Texas Rangers in that order.

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