Dallas

People are getting creative with their disdain for shared bikes strewn around Dallas

LimeBike personnel and Dallas utilities workers were dispatched Friday to take down a shared bike that had been sawed in half and attached to a telephone pole in Deep Ellum.
LimeBike personnel and Dallas utilities workers were dispatched Friday to take down a shared bike that had been sawed in half and attached to a telephone pole in Deep Ellum. Twitter

At least one person has resorted to making street art installations out of the shared bikes that are littering the streets of Dallas.

LimeBike personnel were dispatched to the intersection of Crowdus and Commerce streets in Deep Ellum on Friday to retrieve one of their shared bikes, which appeared to somehow be suspended about 10 feet above a bicycle's normal cruising altitude.

Someone had sawed one of the green bikes in half and bolted the halves on either side of a Deep Ellum telephone pole.

"With an assist from local utility services, it was removed safely," the bike share company tweeted. "We are proud to serve the people and [city of Dallas]."

No fewer than five bike share companies operate in Dallas — VBikes, Ofo, Spin, LimeBike and MoBikes — but it's primarily the dockless variety that have become the butt of the biggest joke in town recently.

The Dallas Morning News reported Friday that Dallas City Manager T.C. Broadnax sent a letter to those five operators with a simple directive to clean up the city's cluttered dockless bike share program. "Relocate all bicycles," it said.

Because this is what can happen if dockless bikeshare operators are allowed to do business in town at a higher volume than the bike-riding population deems necessary.

Local radio personality and cycling enthusiast Craig Miller tweeted his mixed feelings for the dockless bikeshare phenomenon as far back as October 2017.

In December, the Dallas Observer reported that pranksters coined a unique-to-Dallas form of bicycle-related treachery when they "LimeBiked" someone's front yard in East Dallas.

Fort Worth's bike share program is not dockless. Bikes rented from any of the 46 BCycle dock stations must be returned to a dock station or charges continue to mount for the renter.

The BCycle stations first popped up in Fort Worth nearly five years ago. Some 250 shared bikes now call Fort Worth home, and they took 59,280 trips, accounting for 266,648 miles ridden in 2017.

But when there's enough of the things lying around town that people begin to make art installations using them, bike volume seems to have outpaced the city's bike-friendliness quotient.

On Jan. 11, 2014, BMX rider Mat Olson rode his bike over the arches on the northern side of the newly opened bride on West Seventh Street in Fort Worth. This video, shot by local resident Travis Baker, was shared with the Star-Telegram. We caught

This report contains information from the Star-Telegram archives.

Matthew Martinez: 817-390-7667; @MCTinez817

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