Dallas

White nationalist’s dreams come true with Trump win, report says

Interpretive park ranger Caitlin Kostic, center, gives a tour near the high-water mark of the Confederacy at Gettysburg National Military Park to Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, and campaign CEO Steve Bannon, Saturday.
Interpretive park ranger Caitlin Kostic, center, gives a tour near the high-water mark of the Confederacy at Gettysburg National Military Park to Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, and campaign CEO Steve Bannon, Saturday. AP

A white nationalist leader from Dallas remembers the night when Donald Trump was declared president-elect as “one of the greatest moments of my life.”

“When it happened, I thought I might have been dreaming,” Richard Spencer told The Dallas Morning News.

Spencer, 38, is a Dallas native and a leader of the alternative right, which the Dallas newspaper said is the term he coined in 2008 “to describe the radical conservative movement defined by white nationalism and a fervent resistance to multiculturalism and globalism.”

And Trump’s win is the first step toward “identity politics for white people,” Spencer, who reportedly now lives in Montana, told the Morning News.

"That is something major," Spencer said Tuesday night. "He's not your father's conservative. He's not in this to promote free markets or neoconservative foreign politics or to protect Israel, for that matter. He's in this to protect his people. He's in this to protect the historic American nation.

Twitter suspended the accounts of many alt-right leaders and groups Tuesday night, including Spencer’s, citing violations of its policies against hate speech, harassment and violent threats. Spencer said he wasn’t violating those policies and he won’t return to Twitter unless he receives an apology. He released a video saying “this is clearly a sign that we have power.”

Look, I care about my people more than I care about others. It's very simple. What form that takes, I don't know. But I don't believe in equality. I don't care about everyone. I don't care about the world. I want to fight for my people first.

Richard Spencer, interview with The Dallas Morning News

The Morning News reported that Spencer calls himself an "identitarian" but will accept the white nationalist label. He is adamant that he's not a white supremacist, which implies a desire for whites to rule over nonwhites, which he said would be “disastrous.”

Spencer, president of the National Policy Institute, wants a white ethno-state utopia, the Dallas newspaper reported, devoid of black people, Muslims, Jews, Asians or anyone else without a common European heritage and culture.

"Look, I care about my people more than I care about others," Spencer said. "It's very simple. What form that takes, I don't know. But I don't believe in equality. I don't care about everyone. I don't care about the world. I want to fight for my people first."

Trump was supported by the alt-right and the KKK before the election, but the most significant tie between Trump and the white nationalists came when he made his campaign chairman Steve Bannon, the former head of Breitbart News. The right-wing website, under Bannon’s leadership, called Weekly Standard editor Bill Kristol “a renegade Jew,” said “birth control makes women unattractive and crazy” and said “the solution to online harassment is simple: Women should log off.”

Soon after his election, Trump made Bannon his chief White House strategist and senior counselor.

“There must be no sugarcoating the reality that a white nationalist has been named chief strategist for the Trump Administration,” said House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco.

Spencer told the Morning News that he thinks this is the “best possible position” for Bannon.

Mark David Smith: 817-390-7808, @MarkSmith_FWST

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