Arlington

Soldier accused of killing trainer at Arlington Walgreens indicted

Pvt. Ricci Chambless Bradden, 22, was indicted Tuesday, June 28, 2016, on a murder charge in the death of Anthony Antell of Arlington.
Pvt. Ricci Chambless Bradden, 22, was indicted Tuesday, June 28, 2016, on a murder charge in the death of Anthony Antell of Arlington. Courtesy of Arlington Police Department.

The 22-year-old soldier accused of fatally shooting a fitness coach in the parking lot of a Walgreens in south Arlington in May was indicted Tuesday on a murder charge.

A Tarrant County grand jury also indicted Pvt. Ricci Chambless Bradden on a felony charge of aggravated assault of a family member with a deadly weapon, according to court records.

Bradden shot his wife, an employee at the Walgreens store, before shooting Anthony Antell Jr. shortly before noon on May 2, police have said.

Police described Antell as a “Good Samaritan” who approached Bradden with a gun in the parking lot after seeing Bradden shoot his wife.

After shooting Antell, police said, Bradden fled south before turning himself into authorities in Hillsboro more than an hour away.

Bradden, an Army private stationed at Fort Hood, said he slapped Antell’s gun out of his hand and then shot him, according to an arrest warrant affidavit.

Bradden’s wife, a Walgreens employee, told investigators that she was surprised to see her husband show up at the store because he was supposed to be at Fort Hood.

The wife said she and Bradden walked outside to talk, and Bradden became very angry and shot close to her feet. Bradden shot a second time and hit her in the “ankle area,” the arrest warrant affidavit said. She ran into the store and “yelled for help.”

Antell was owner of CrossFit Abattoir, 5500 S. Cooper Street, according to his Facebook page.

Upcoming court appearance

Bradden has a bail reduction hearing scheduled for 9 a.m. Thursday in 213th District Court.

He has been in Tarrant County Jail since May 3 with bail totaling $515,000.

In the motion to reduce his bail, Bradden’s attorney, Peter Schulte, referenced “the ‘castle doctrine’ related to vehicles and self-defense” as a possible defense in the case.

Under the 2007 Texas law, often referred to as the castle doctrine, a person can legally use deadly force if someone unlawfully enters or attempts to use force to enter that person’s occupied home, vehicle or workplace.

Schulte requested that Bradden’s bail be reduced “to an amount that the Defendant can post so he can be released to better prepare his defense.”

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